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Celebrate the Northern California Book Awards by creating your own book award

Red Letter

The Red Letter

Authors of the World Unite! | 21 March 2013

Dear Subscriber,

 

“I don’t deserve this award. But I have arthritis and I don’t deserve that either.” –Jack Benny

After the Pulitzer committee’s failure to award a prize for fiction in 2012, Stanford writing professor Adam Johnson was awarded the 2013 prize for his novel of North Korea, The Orphan Master’s Son. To celebrate the award and the others being given out this spring, we’d like you to create your own book award, and write about it on your Red Room blog.

Johnson will also be among the nominees on Sunday, May 19th, at what has become one of Red Room’s favorite annual events, the Northern California Book Awards, organized by the terrific nonprofit PoetryFlash. He joins Red Room authors Lemony Snicket a.k.a. Daniel Handler (“Who Could That Be at This Hour”), Lucille Lang Day (Married at Fourteen), Dave Eggers (A Hologram for a King), Tamim Ansary (Games without Rules), Beverley Bie Brahic (translation of Apollinaire’s The Little Auto), and Ashley Wolff (Baby Bear Sees Blue).

This week, please think of a creative, unique “award” you’d like to give a book published in 2012 and post a blog entry about it. “Book I Wish I’d Written and I Resent the Author for it,” “Book That If Everyone Read It Would Change the World for the Better” or “Most Effective Literary Pretention Used to Hide Lack of Plot”? We can’t wait to see what you come up with.

Blog and win copies of books by nominees Snicket, Day, or Brahic»

SUPPORT POETRYFLASH AND THE NORTHERN CALIFORNIA BOOK AWARDS


Joyce Jenkins and her colleagues run a precious local institution. Red Room is proud to support them, and we hope you will, too. You can donate to PoetryFlash here; also, nominees have been chosen in part by readers suggested by Red Room editors. If you’d like to be a reader for next year’s awards, please write to us and we’ll connect you with Joyce. And attend the awards ceremony at the public library—it’s free.

WANT TO APPEAR IN OUR BOOKSTORE WINDOW?

Help tens of thousands of avid readers know about your book!

 

Lillian Lambert says, “Red Room has brought more attention to my two books than I could have imagined.” Our Bookstore Window newsletter goes out biweekly to 40,000 avid readers. We can put your book in front of each of their faces, with a link to buy in just one click. Learn how to add your book by writing us at editors@redroom.com. If you’re a publisher interested in promoting several of your front-list authors, write to me at gina@redroom.com.

PREVIOUS BLOG CHALLENGE

Getting Back to Nature

 

From a trip to the most remote destination a search engine could find (think walruses in ice-filled seas) to the deeper intimacy that comes from walking the same path through the same woods many times, Red Roomers shared their stories of enjoying what Thoreau called “the tonic of wildness.”
Read them all and join the conversation»

Warmest Regards,

Gina Misiroglu

Executive Editor, Red Room
 

 
  (North Korea) is an unverifiable place. But to the fiction writer, the myth, the legend, the fables are all powerful tools to create a psychological portrait.”  
-Adam Johnson, whose novel The Orphan Master’s Son, won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.»

KAYA OAKES
Congratulations!

She’ll be the 2014 Writer in Residence in St. Mary’s College's creative nonfiction MFA program.
Browse her books»

SIMON J. HALLIDAY
Welcome New Member

He’s self-publishing his series of children’s books.
Learn about his Kickstarter campaign»

NEW RELEASE

Two sisters recover from widowhood, divorce, and Bernie Madoff as unexpected roommates in a Manhattan apartment in Elinor Lipman’sThe View from Penthouse B.

See more new releases and editors and authors picks »

BOOK GIVEAWAYS

Blog and win a copy of Part I of Lemony Snicket’s All the Wrong Questions series, “Who Could That Be at This Hour?”

See all of this week’s giveaways »

 

A "Red-Letter Day" is a memorably happy and significant day; the term comes from the custom of marking holidays on a calendar in red ink (first known usage in 1704). We hope you have a Red-Letter Day today!

 
 
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