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The Three Sisters Excerpt 5: Rocking The Cradle

                    

When each of the girls reached legal age, in acts of defiance and

autonomy, they changed their birth names. Windy became Wisteria,

Shanty became Chantilly and Bonky became Belladonna.

 

Harboring the celestial qualities of an ethereal crystal ball, each of the

Pilgrims wished for a glance into the future.

 

Wisteria longed to see the violent births and deaths of colossal star

systems, and the beginning of the universe. She also hoped to gaze upon

her archeologically exhumed ancestors throughout the world.

 

But, as Destiny courted Fate and Fate danced with Dreams and Dreams

conspired with Reality, Wisteria died at the age of thirty, a novice but

respected anthropologist and painter.

 

Although she celebrated her distinguished intellectual and artistic success

and somewhat circumvented global adventures, she lamented her ensuing

demise as she recognized and regretted the incurability of a progressive

degenerative illness that compromised her daily pursuits.

 

Wisteria had maintained academic refuge in the city and bore no children.

She sadly deserted her surviving lover with the promise of becoming

iridescent stardust glowing eternally in the night sky.

 

Upon her death, Wisteria relinquished to her lover, a copper box of

personal objects: swatches of colorful textiles; hand painted porcelain

beads; miniature ceramic dolls and figurines; a collection of small pottery

shards, broken seashells and faded photographs; love letters and vials of

sand from a few foreign lands and exotic beaches.

 

Contrarily, Chantilly wanted to live in the country, raising a large brood

of playful children, while serendipitously awaiting government assistance

designed for the chronically unemployed.

 

But, as Destiny courted Fate and Fate danced with Dreams and Dreams

conspired with Reality, Chantilly’s few ideas and little ambition led to

constant financial pleading from relatives.

 

She died penniless, at the age of thirty-seven while giving birth to her first

offspring on a communal farm, after refusing medical intervention from a

nearby birthing clinic. To quell the pain of a breech presentation,

Chantilly desperately inhaled the essence of an hallucinogenic plant,

nullifying the agonizing physical sensations during an adamantly

prolonged and fruitless labor. A prematurely detached placenta, fetal

distress and blood loss resulted in the mother’s and child’s eventual

deaths.

 

Chantilly’s surviving partners were frantically undecided whose stillborn

child and wanton woman the dead were, when the medical officers,

coroner and police arrived the next day.

 

Belladonna, the youngest of The Three Sisters, outlived everyone, except

her own offspring. She fancifully desired to own and operate an exclusive

gift shop representing artisans and craftsmen in her region.

 

But, as Destiny courted Fate and Fate danced with Dreams and Dreams

conspired with Reality, Belladonna married a traveling salesman

specializing in wholesaling Christian Bibles to schools, hospitals and

hotels.

 

Forlorn and uninterested in higher education, Belladonna became a

mother of five children with no opportunity to test her envisioned

entrepreneurial abilities. By day, she became a profound kleptomaniac

and in her limited spare time in the evenings, Belladonna attended activist

meetings. She wasn’t supporting animal rights or environmental safety;

instead, she was a member of a subversive anti-abortionist group and a

local chapter of white supremacists promoting racial hatred. Belladonna’s

parents also attended the meetings whenever they visited.

 

But, as Destiny courted Fate and Fate danced with Dreams and Dreams

conspired with Reality, Belladonna’s parents were killed in a car accident

on their way home from a visitation and meetings with their daughter and

grandchildren.

 

Years later, Belladonna’s final waltz with Idleness, Intellectual Bankruptcy

and Grief, found her suffering from clostridium botulinus, a toxin

acquired by her own decision to consume unknowingly, the tainted

contents of a home preserve. The resulting blurred vision, dizziness,

slurred speech and difficulty swallowing, left her helpless and frightened.

 

Her children were all attending colleges and universities and her husband

was away on business when Belladonna finally succumbed to the fatal

consequences of botulism food poisoning. By the time an inquiring

anarchist neighbor called an ambulance, she was unresponsive and

consequently pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital. The cause of

death was reportedly suffocation due to muscle paralysis.

 

Belladonna had reached the age of fifty-two without a glimpse of her

daughters’ destinies. Had she gazed into a crystal ball before ingesting

her last supper, the embalmed Belladonna would have seen the youngest

and most sympathetically dependant daughter, suicide following her

maternal loss.

 

The remaining four impeccably healthy daughters became active secular

humanists with doctorates in Archeology, Astronomy, Forensic Pathology

and Bio-Genetics. Assisted by loans, scholarships and bursaries, they

lectured and published papers evaluating deviancy, the penal system,

atheism and cosmic entropy.

 

Their collective views were projected widely and objectively among

scholars and laymen and women in every dynamic field of evolutionary

and scientific study. As educated women of a beguiling nature, they

challenged subversive ideology with courage and pride.

 

They were after all, descendants of an ancient matriarchal ancestry,

steeped in vision, lore and Goddess worship. Like the diverse multitudes

of ancient women born in the cradle of civilization and whose predated

remains now occupied primitive burial sites and mausoleums, they too,

were sisters of Venus and daughters of Lucy.

 

They were all children entombed in a complex interconnected solar

system terminally encoded to scrutinize information, seek answers,

question derision, and apply intelligent thought provoking solutions.

 

Unlike their mother, the deceased and buried Belladonna, each of the four

aspiring daughters acquired extraordinary collections of beautiful and

puzzling natural objects. They obtained intriguing artistic creations

formed by human hands.

 

Each of the daughters discovered simple but evocative harmonies within

the structures of the seashells, stones and bones they found. They

marveled at the intricacies and emotional compositions of the sculptures,

paintings, pottery and amulets they encountered and purchased with

absolute reverence and admiration.

 

The collections the young women possessed, represented altarpieces of

divine splendor, objects which sustained their pursuit of the

unconquerable.

 

As architectural monoliths, scientific discoveries and space travel

symbolized human achievement, so too, did their collections of valuable

artifacts represent nature’s resources and tools that contributed to human

creativity and technological advancement.

 

Like precious pearls formed inside oyster shells on the ocean floor, so too,

were the daughters of the forgotten Belladonna, becoming beads for the

universal necklace of human endeavor. Confidently, they embarked on a

quest for infinite treasure, resilience and eternal beauty.

 

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Comments
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Absolutely a wonderful read!

I was in awe from the get go.

You write as if some higher force is guiding your hand across the page.

I as reader am caught up in the imagery as words and sentences and paragraphs dissolve into dust leaving image upon image on the sandy beach of my mind.

I leave this post like I leave a movie caught up in the thoughts I see and the feelings that move me.

I was going to write about forgiveness, but I instead humble myself and nominate this post for its purity and splendor.

Kindest,
Michael Pokocky

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Thanks for your comments.

"Rocking The Cradle"  is the final one of five short stories, all of which are posted on my RRblog.