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Tim's Latest Blogs

Mar.14.2013 - 3:54 am
When Eddie blows up the family hedge fund his only assets are a gift for gab and a prize winning Chili con Carne. While seeking work as a roadhouse chef, he never imagines he...
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Mar.17.2012 - 11:44 pm
  This is a new short story, the first piece I've produced since finishing my apprenticeship novel. I believe it takes my writing to a whole new level. It's pure storytelling...
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Mar.16.2012 - 11:46 pm
This scene, from my novel, Banana Republican Blues, depicts the act in a humorous vein, as if seen through gauzy curtains rather than a keyhole, and it's more about communication...
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Mar.07.2012 - 8:50 pm
  Lars Iyer is a well known figure of the literary blogosphere, and as a relative neophyte in the space, I only recently came across his name, but liking what I sampled of...
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Reviews I've Written

A Small Hotel.jpg
17.Aug.2011
Tim Chambers reviews
I looked at the first chapter of this on Kindle. It seemed there were two or three uses of "and" in every sentence, even sentences beginning with and, so I counted them. He uses...

Comments from Tim

Jan.29.2012 - 4:16 pm
In response to: Dirty, Pretty Things Part 2
Short of all of us modelling our lives on Saint Francis of Assisi, what would you have us do? Do we have any...
Jan.27.2012 - 11:20 pm
In response to: Dirty, Pretty Things: Apple, Inc. and China
When I talk about these things to my Japanese students, they think of them as a matter of course, but they are a lot...
Jan.27.2012 - 8:29 pm
In response to: Dirty, Pretty Things: Apple, Inc. and China
Dennis, I agree with you, it's an outrage what Apple makes on each device, and how much they could do to ease the...
Jan.13.2012 - 5:32 am
In response to: Comments please.
Thank you, Wong Li Ming. I'll take it under advisement and see what others have to say. I did cut one of the sentences...
Dec.10.2011 - 9:12 pm
In response to: The American Dream and the Two Parties
Financial analyst Barry Ritholtz, a leading advocate of re-regulating financial markets, calls it like it is.