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Thomas Burchfield's Blog

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Sep.16.2011
I took four years to write my novel Dragon’s Ark (now available at your local independent bookstore, on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Powell's, including e-book editions). I’m expending even more sand trying to persuade everyone in the English-language reading world to open its creaking door...
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Sep.09.2011
I love Italy. I've never been there, know only enough Italian to order pizza, and the way household economics are calculated, my wife and I are not likely to visit there anytime soon. But I love Italy, anyway, like a distant lover. Hello Italia, from across both seas, digital and global! I was not...
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Sep.03.2011
[Another version of this piece can be found at my official web page, A Curious Man. Thanks for reading!] As of this writing, an essay I posted here in February 2011 about character actor Lee Van Cleef has received 255 unique page views, number one of all the 100-plus articles I’ve placed on Blogger...
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Aug.27.2011
(A version of this peace, with photos, can be found at my official web page. Thanks for reading!)   The other day I performed a small but poignant task—removing the name of Louise Clark, who died early Sunday morning, August 21, from my e-mail distribution list for this space. I married my way...
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Aug.20.2011
(A version of this piece, with photo, can be found on my official web page, A Curious Man.   Hammer Films’ Dracula (produced Britain in 1957 and released in the United States as The Horror of Dracula) stars an actor I believe is the last great screen Dracula in that curiously small assemblage...
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Aug.13.2011
I’ve written before about the effect on me of watching BelaLugosi in the 1931 Dracula; the effect of his creeping through ancient shadows down that cobwebbed staircase, his cape gleaming with starlight, on a fatherless eight-year-old.     I was transfixed by Lugosi’s piercing stare,...
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Aug.06.2011
Getting It Published   For those of you visiting for the first time, it happened like this: in December 2005, I began writing my debut novel Dragon’s Ark. In June 2009, I finally typed “THE END.” I then spent a year in grim pursuit of literary agents, knowing that, even if successful, my novel...
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Jul.30.2011
(Thanks for coming by, but if you're not reading this at my official web page, you are sure missing some nice photos!)   On Friday, Elizabeth and I walked through golden morning to the Alpine County Sheriff’s Office to present Dragon’s Ark to Christine Branscombe, deputy, support services...
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Jul.29.2011
[If you're reading this here and not at my official web page, you're missing some swell photos!)   You may have noticed a sag in my marketing efforts for my novel Dragon’s Ark (Ambler HousePublishing; $15, available in POD through your local bookstore, Amazon, Barnes& Noble, Powell's...
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Jul.16.2011
(Welcome to my parlor! Another version of this piece, with creepy screen captures, can be read at my official web page. Thanks!)   Considering the number of words I’ve bled over Dracula, it’s fair to think me a Dracula-movie fanboy, lying for endless hours in my little coffin, a TV nailed to...
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Jul.06.2011
Welcome: This week I'm guest posting about my experiences as an indie publisher at the Web page of Joel Friedlander, the Book Designer and the interior designer of my novel Dragon's Ark. Joel's a great guy, a pioneer in this field and the place the start for those of you considering trekking this...
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Jul.01.2011
[Another version of this piece, with illustrative enhancement, can be found at my official web page]   Judgment on Deltchev was Eric Ambler’s first novel after a 10-year hiatus that started in 1940, at the dawn of World War II. It tells the story of Foster, an English playwright suffering...
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Jun.15.2011
  Bay Area author Matt Stewart has turned loose a bright, peppery, infectious, debut novel, The French Revolution, an irreverent literacy farce that entertains for most of its cheerfully eccentric path. It’s fresh, funny, and bright, qualities seldom found in our overly earnest literature,...
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Jun.06.2011
(The second part of an article which attempts, rightly or wrongly, to persuade that Dracula by Bram Stoker deserves to be called “literature.”)   “So great was the magnetism of his genius, so profound was the sense of his dominancy that I sat spellbound”—Bram Stoker on Henry Irving  ...
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May.27.2011
(Another version of this piece, with visual aid, is available at my official webpage.)   Over the years, I've grown fond of describing Dracula by Bram Stoker as “the greatest novel ever written by a hack.” Brother, you should see the looks I get. To some (especially those of uncritical...
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