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Suzanne Matson's Books

A Trick of Nature
Jun.19.2008
Greg Goodman is a very ordinary guy—a not very ambitious schooteacher and football coach who takes his attractive wife, Patty, their twin adolescent daughters, and the comfortable ease of their suburban routine for granted. Until lightning strikes—both literally and figuratively—as Greg runs a pattern with his junior varsity team during a muggy August practice and fifteen-year-old...
The Tree-Sitter
Jun.19.2008
A privileged and gifted Wellesley student, Julie Prince seems destined for success—until she falls in love with Neil, a young environmental activist. Following him to the old-growth forests of Oregon, where she sees firsthand the gravity of the threat, she joins a group of tree-sitters attempting to protect the endangered landscape from destruction. But when Neil’s acts of protest...
The Hunger Moon
Jun.19.1997
A waitress and now a single mother, Renata wants only to give her baby boy, Charlie, a better start. So she packs up her spare life, leaves her boyfriend behind, and heads across the country in search of a new place to begin. She settles in Boston, and her life is suddenly changed by her chance meeting of two unlikely women: Eleanor, a seventy-eight-year-old widow who is stripping...
Durable Goods
Jun.19.1993
“Matson’s specialty is writing about strangers: a woman selling flowers on a railroad platform, a toddler whose destitute father swats her in a bus station, a heavyset Italian boy playing ball. The shadowy figures who inhabit these poems are as unfamiliar to the speaker as they are to the reader, but the poet’s deft eye catches them midstride at the moment of decision, resulting in...
Sea Level
Jun.19.1990
“Suzanne Matson’s Sea Level provides us everything we’d expect—skill, authority, emotional strength, delicacy, assurance—in a fourth book, and it’s her first. This is a memorable debut and a book to be read again and again.” —William Matthews “Matson possesses a talent equal to many of her best contemporaries.” —Harvard Book Review