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Chicken Soup for the Soul: Twins and More
Chicken Soup for the Soul: Twins and More
$14.95
Paperback
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BOOK DETAILS

  • Paperback
  • Mar.10.2009
  • 9781935096320

Susan gives an overview of the book:

Twins and triplets have a reputation for being double trouble, but they're also multiple blessings for those whose lives they touch. These stories, written by multiples and people who love them, will touch your heart and tickle your funny bone. Read all about: The joys and challenges of pregnancy with multiples Sleepless nights and endless feedings with two or more babies The pranks and "switcheroos" pulled by identical twins The chaos and silliness of everyday life with multiples The special bond that twins share Grandparenting multiples Twins who arrive under special circumstances, such as adoption or surrogacy Adventures with multiples And much more!
Read full overview »

Twins and triplets have a reputation for being double trouble, but they're also multiple blessings for those whose lives they touch. These stories, written by multiples and people who love them, will touch your heart and tickle your funny bone. Read all about:

  • The joys and challenges of pregnancy with multiples
  • Sleepless nights and endless feedings with two or more babies
  • The pranks and "switcheroos" pulled by identical twins
  • The chaos and silliness of everyday life with multiples
  • The special bond that twins share
  • Grandparenting multiples
  • Twins who arrive under special circumstances, such as adoption or surrogacy
  • Adventures with multiples
  • And much more!
Read an excerpt »

Foreword

 

I was completely shocked when I found out I was expecting twins. There was no family history of multiples. Growing up, I knew only one family with twins, and they had two sets! (One set of boys was fraternal; the other twin boys were identical.) But other than that, I'd never really thought about twins very much. All that changed one morning in the spring of 2003 in my doctor's office. Since then, I've learned that I tend to be in the minority when it comes to thinking about twins. Everywhere I go with my family, the twins get all of the attention. And look how much press celebrities receive when they're expecting twins!

But this love of twins is nothing new. In fact, twins have fascinated people for thousands of years. Throughout history, certain cultures have actually considered it a curse or a bad omen to be a twin or give birth to twins! Other cultures have revered twins and seen them as a sign of good fortune.

Ancient mythology is riddled with tales of twins. In Greek mythology, it was believed that twins were conceived when a woman had relations with both a mortal man and a god on the same day. When twins resulted, one of them would have godlike qualities and the other would be an ordinary mortal person. This was true for Heracles, known as Hercules in Western cultures, son of the god Zeus and the human Alcmene, who also conceived Iphicles, a twin for Heracles, with her mortal husband, Amphitryon.

And, of course, there were the famous "Gemini twins," Castor and Pollux. In Greek and Roman mythology, the twins were born of the same mother, but had different fathers. Pollux was an immortal god, while Castor was mortal. However, when Castor died, Pollux was so grieved that he asked Zeus to keep them together, so Castor and Pollux were made into the Gemini constellation that we see among the stars.

Twins were often cited in various mythologies to explain the dualistic nature of the universe. For example, Greek gods Apollo and Artemis were known as the sun god and the moon goddess, respectively. In the Xingu myths of Brazil, twin brothers Kuat and Iae represented the sun and the moon. To the Fon people in Benin, West Africa, the god Liza is representative of the sun, while his twin Mawu is associated with the moon.

Twins have also been seen as the polar forces of good and evil. In Zoroastrian myths, good and evil were represented by the twins Ahriman and Ahura Mazda. A Native American myth tells the story of Gluskap, a god of creation, who must defeat Malsum, his evil twin, who ruled the demons. Even the Biblical twins, Jacob and Esau, were completely different. It was said that they struggled with each other even in their mother's womb, and their competitiveness and animosity continued throughout their lives.

Long ago, the Yoruba tribe of Nigeria would kill twins, and sometimes their mother, because they believed the twins were evil or the result of their mother's liaison with two men. However, in today's times, the Yoruba see twins as a good sign, a welcome change of perspective considering that the Yoruba have an exceptionally high incidence (5%) of twin births. Scientists are not sure if it's because the villagers eat a lot of yams (which contain a natural hormone called phytoestrogen that may stimulate the ovaries to produce more eggs) or whether it's genetics (in which Yoruban women inherit the tendency to release more eggs).

In Native American cultures, women were sometimes advised not to eat foods that were thought to increase the likelihood of conceiving twins, such as bananas and double almonds, because twins were viewed negatively. However, other Native American tribes saw twins in a positive light.

Fortunately, in today's modern world, twins and multiples are seen as a blessing, despite their reputation for "double trouble" and "multiple mischief." Who cannot be moved by the sight of twin babies snuggled together in a crib, holding hands as they begin their lives together? Who hasn't dreamed of having an identical twin with whom one could switch places when it comes to a dreaded exam or a conflicting appointment? Twins themselves tell of the great blessing of always having a confidant by their side. It somehow makes the difficulties of life much easier to digest. And for parents who have struggled with infertility, the arrival of twins, triplets or more signifies the joyous end to many years of tears and dashed hopes.

The stories in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Twins and More explore the many joys and challenges of being twins and raising multiples. The special bond they share, the challenges they face together, the trouble they get into, and the mysteries surrounding twins are all evident in these tales submitted by twins, parents of multiples, and friends and relatives of these special siblings. Just like the people of ancient times, we're still fascinated by twins -- and you're certain to be inspired and delighted by the stories in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Twins and More!

 

Susan M. Heim

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Note from the author coming soon...

About Susan

Susan Heim is an author and editor, specializing in parenting, multiples, and women's issues, and is a former Senior Editor for the bestselling Chicken Soup for the Soul series. Susan's books include It's Twins! Parent-to-Parent Advice from...

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