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Excerpt from PIGSKIN WARRIORS
COLLEGE BOWL SEASON MIGHT BE THE MOST EXCITING TIME IN SPORTS

THE BOWLS, THE POLLS AND THE ROLLS

 

THE BOWLS

 

JANUARY JAMBOREE

 

After twelve years, the Tournament of Roses in Pasadena, California thought that their New Year’s Day festival would attract more interest if it were moved to Washington’s Birthday, converting it into an offshoot of the patriotic holiday.

James Wagner, a newcomer from the East, was elected president of the tournament in the fall of 1901. He suggested staging a post-season football game to draw more interest and spectators. A guarantee of $3,500 was offered to participating teams, covering expenses. There was immediate concern that this would dry up the tournament’s fund. When Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost, the coach of Michigan's undefeated team, issued a challenge to the University of California early in December, Wagner saw an opportunity. A Michigan-California matchup, he reasoned, would be a great draw in Pasadena.

California turned down the challenge. Stanford - where Yost had coached in 1900 - stepped in as a substitute. A crowd of about 8,000 watched Michigan annihilate the Indians, 49-0.

To the great relief of Wagner and the tournament committee, the game was very profitable. The problem was the score. Organizers believed its lopsided nature would discourage fans from returning in 1903. They replaced football with chariot racing. After amateur drivers did not work out because they kept colliding with one another, professionals were brought in to race the chariots. Then spectators began to suspect the races were fixed. The committee decided to try football again.

The second Tournament of Roses game, as it was then called, took place on January 1, 1916. Washington State beat Brown, 14-0. Originally played in Pasadena's Tournament Park, the game was successful from that point on. It had the effect of demonstrating that, after years of Eastern and Midwestern domination, Western football was now superior. Washington and the Pacific Northwest played the best brand of football in the 1910s. The state of California produced excellent teams, too; Stanford and the University of California. UCLA did not even open for business until 1919, and the University of Southern California still struggled for recognition.

Stanford Stadium was built in 1921. It was one of the first of the great football arenas, at least in the West. Harvard had built a 42,000-seat facility almost two decades prior to that, and the Yale Bowl opened in 1914. Stanford Stadium was a statement; about its school, its conference (the young PCC), its state and its region. World War I was now over. A population shift to the Pacific Coast was underway. Radio would be invented. The “Roaring ‘20s” were in full swing. Newspapers sold out on the strength of grandiose sports coverage by the likes of Grantland Rice and Ring Lardner. America went gaga over its athletic heroes: Babe Ruth, Red Grange, "The Four Horsemen of Notre Dame." The popularity of baseball was easily translated to football. The National Football League opened for business.

Huge stadiums were built on college campuses in the 1920s throughout the West, the Midwest, the East, the North, and the South. American supremacy was “declared” in New York, via building of the "House That Ruth Built" (Yankee Stadium) five years after U.S. forces in the Argonne forced the Kaiser to acquiesce. The Los Angeles Coliseum, with its Roman motifs, was a West Coast version of its ancient counterpart; the gladiators of its spectacular green plains symbolizing the bold, superior nature of a young country and a younger city.   

Stanford took one look around the collegiate landscape. They saw the future and decided to harness it. They would be the next great football power. With the building of Stanford Stadium, they decided to bid for the Rose Bowl to travel some 350 miles north and be played in Palo Alto instead of little Tournament Park in Pasadena. There was immediate momentum in favor of this move. However, people made note of the fact that it often rains in Northern California on January 1. As the famed 1960s song exclaims, it almost “never rains in Southern California." Pasadena’s Arroyo Seco often resembles Shangri-La on New Year’s Day; temperatures reaching into the eighties with just a touch of mist drifting in from the canyons of the surrounding, snowcapped San Gabriel Mountains. When the most visionary pioneers set forth for the 1849 California “gold rush,”  those with the wildest imaginations might have pictured something like it.

The city of Pasadena also saw the future. They stepped up. ding what needed to be done, assuring that their precious Rose Bowl would stay in its city. The Rose Bowl stadium was built, opening for business in 1922. In its first New Year’s Day game on January 1, 1923, Southern California defeated Penn State, 14-3.

The building of the Rose Bowl and the Coliseum some ten miles away, across the street from the USC campus just south of downtown L.A., was enormous. The huge crowds filling these stadiums did not only lead to a power shift away from the northern California schools, California and Stanford, in favor of Southern California. The Olympics were drawn to the city just nine years later. The Rose Bowl would become a wild success of legendary proportions. The West and the Pacific Coast Conference would come to be the dominant football and sports region of America. USC would ride the whirlwind of that dominance above and beyond all over programs.

 The Rose Bowl’s great success led to other bowl games. For a brief period in the mid-1920s, a Christmas Festival was played at the Coliseum. In 1933, Miami started a Palm Festival on New Year’s Day, with a post-season game between the University of Miami and Manhattan College as an attraction. To capitalize on the Rose Bowl's popularity, the game was renamed the Orange Bowl and the festival became the Orange Bowl Festival in 1935.

Also in 1935, the Sugar Bowl was inaugurated in New Orleans. Two more bowl games began in Texas in the next two years: El Paso's Sun Bowl (1936) and the Cotton Bowl in Dallas (1937). Although they were not called bowls, many other post-season games were played during the early 1930s, raising money for various charitable efforts established to raise money for the growing number of unemployed.

The NCAA estimates that there were more than 100 such games, almost all of them one-shot affairs. The effect of these games was the resumption of the Army-Navy football series. The two service academies stopped playing their annual game after the 1927 season. In 1930, they were persuaded to play a charity game in New York's Yankee Stadium. It drew a large, enthusiastic crowd, and was repeated in 1931 before another throng. Its success created full Army-Navy athletic relations in 1932.

After World War II, a number of new bowl games started:, the Cigar Bowl in Tampa, the Camellia Bowl in Louisiana, the Delta Bowl in Memphis, the Dixie Bowl in Birmingham, the Great Lakes Bowl in Cleveland, the Harbor Bowl in San Diego, the Oil Bowl in Houston, the Raisin Bowl in Fresno, and the Salad Bowl in Phoenix.

Two post-season games founded in that period are still in existence, the Gator Bowl and the Florida Citrus Bowl (originally the Tangerine Bowl). A third, San Antonio's Alamo Bowl, was revived in 1993 after having been played just once before, in 1947.

Since the late 1950s, the prospect of money from television lured many other bowl games into existence. Some went out of business after just a year or two, others lasted a decade or more, and a few of them have become fixtures of the holiday season.

More recently, television exposure for sponsoring companies became as important as the money paid for television rights. In 1988 the Sugar Bowl became the much-maligned USF&G Sugar Bowl, but aside from the Rose Bowl this trend has continued. There is no reason to see it coming to an end soon. There is the FedEx Orange Bowl, the Southwestern Bell Cotton Bowl (which was, for a time, the Mobil Cotton Bowl), and the Nokia Sugar Bowl, to name a few.

Then there is the Blockbuster Bowl, the Carquest Bowl, and now the MicronPC.com Bowl. “Bowl season" has been extended beyond New Year’s Day. The first bowl game is played about a week before Christmas and the last is played early in January, but after New Years.

 

Rose Bowl

Pasadena, California

Capacity: 102,038

Date: January 1 (with exceptions)

 

The "granddaddy of ‘em all," as it is called, originated as an extra-added attraction to Pasadena's Tournament of Roses. From 1922 through 1945, the Rose Bowl pitted the Pacific Coast Conference champion against an at-large opponent, usually from the East or the South. Starting with the 1946 season, the bowl featured the Pacific-10 (previously PCC, AAWU and Pac-8) with the Big 10 champions.

With the formation of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS), if either conference champion is ranked number one or number two, that champion will play in the BCS championship game, to be replaced by that conference's second-ranked team. The Rose Bowl hosted the BCS championship game in 2002 (Miami over Nebraska) and on January 4, 2005 it was the sight of what is probably considered the greatest collegiate football game ever played, Texas’s stunning comeback win over USC for the national championship.

 

Year            Result

1902            Michigan 49, Stanford 0           

1916            Washington St. 14, Brown 0           

1917            Oregon 14, Penn 0           

1918            Mare Island 19, Camp Lewis 7           

1919            Great Lakes 17, Mare Island 0           

1920            Harvard 7, Oregon 6           

1921            California 28, Ohio St. 0           

1922            California 0, Wash. & Jeff. 0           

1923            USC 14, Penn St. 0           

1924            Navy 14, Washington 14           

1925            Notre Dame 27, Stanford 10           

1926            Alabama 20, Washington 19           

1927            Alabama 7, Stanford 7           

1928            Stanford 7, Pittsburgh 6           

1929            Georgia Tech 8, California 7           

1930            USC 47, Pittsburgh 14           

1931            Alabama 24, Washington St. 0           

1932            USC 21, Tulane 12           

1933            USC 35, Pittsburgh 0           

1934            Columbia 7, Stanford 0           

1935            Alabama 29, Stanford 13           

1936            Stanford 7, SMU 0           

1937            Pittsburgh 21, Washington 0           

1938            California 13, Alabama 0           

1939            USC 7, Duke 3           

1940            USC 14, Tennessee 0           

1941            Stanford 21, Nebraska 13           

1942            Oregon St. 20, Duke 16           

1943            Georgia 9, UCLA 0           

1944            USC 29, Washington 0           

1945            USC 25, Tennessee 0           

1946            Alabama 34, USC 14           

1947            Illinois 45, UCLA 14           

1948            Michigan 49, USC 0           

1949            Northwestern 20, California 14           

1950            Ohio St. 17, California 14           

1951            Michigan 14, California 6           

1952            Illinois 40, Stanford 7           

1953            USC 7, Wisconsin 0           

1954            Michigan St. 28, UCLA 20           

1955            Ohio St. 20, USC 7           

1956            Michigan St. 17, UCLA 14           

1957            Iowa 35, Oregon St. 19           

1958            Ohio St. 10, Oregon 7           

1959            Iowa 38, California 12           

1960            Washington 44, Wisconsin 8           

1961            Washington 17, Minnesota 7           

1962            Minnesota 21, UCLA 3           

1963            USC 42, Wisconsin 37           

1964            Illinois 17, Washington 7           

1965            Michigan 34, Oregon St. 7           

1966            UCLA 14, Michigan St. 12           

1967            Purdue 14, USC 13           

1968            USC 14, Indiana 3           

1969            Ohio St. 27, USC 16           

1970            USC 10, Michigan 3           

1971            Stanford 27, Ohio St. 17           

1972            Stanford 13, Michigan 12           

1973            USC 42, Ohio St. 17           

1974            Ohio St. 42, USC 21           

1975            USC 18, Ohio St. 17           

1976            UCLA 23, Ohio St. 10           

1977            USC 14, Michigan 6           

1978            Washington 27, Michigan 20           

1979            USC 17, Michigan 10           

1980            USC 17, Ohio St. 16           

1981            Michigan 23, Washington 6           

1982            Washington 28, Iowa 0           

1983            UCLA 24, Michigan 14           

1984            UCLA 45, Illinois 9           

1985            USC 20, Ohio St. 17           

1986            UCLA 45, Iowa 28           

1987            Arizona St. 22, Michigan 15           

1988            Michigan St. 20, USC 17           

1989            Michigan 22, USC 14           

1990            USC 17, Michigan 10           

1991            Washington 46, Iowa 34           

1992            Washington 34, Michigan 14           

1993            Michigan 38, Washington 31           

1994            Wisconsin 21, UCLA 16           

1995            Penn St. 38, Oregon 20           

1996            USC 41, Northwestern 32           

1997            Ohio St. 20, Arizona St. 17           

1998            Michigan 21, Washington St. 16           

1999            Wisconsin 38, UCLA 31           

2000            Wisconsin 17, Stanford 9           

2001            Washington 34, Purdue 24           

2002            Miami (FL) 37, Nebraska 14           

2003            Oklahoma 34, Washington St. 14           

2004            Southern Cal 28, Michigan 14           

2005            Texas 38, Michigan 37           

2006            Texas 41, Southern Cal 38           

2007            Southern Cal 32, Michigan 18           

 

Orange Bowl Miami, Florida

Pro Player Stadium (capacity: 75,192)

Date: January

 

The second-oldest bowl game was created in 1933 as part of the Miami Palm Festival. It became known as the Orange Bowl in 1935. Originally played in Miami Field Stadium, it moved into its own stadium, also known as the Orange Bowl, in 1938. Since 1996, the game has been staged in Pro Player Stadium, which is in Ft. Lauderdale.

In 1965 the Orange Bowl became the first major bowl game to be played at night. It was an enormous spectacle, pitting number one Alabama against defending national champion Texas, with the Longhorns prevailing in a thriller over Joe Namath’s Crimson Tide, 21-17. It has been at night ever since.

From 1953 through 1963 and 1975 through 1994, it featured the Big 8 champion against an at-large opponent. During the intervening years, the Big 8 champion or runner-up often played in the Orange Bowl, but did not get an automatic invitation.

Federal Express (FedEx) has sponsored the game since 1989. As a member of the Bowl Alliance, the Orange Bowl hosted the “mythical national championship game” in 1994, another "Game of the Century" affair between Florida State and Nebraska, with the Seminoles giving Bobby Bowed his first national title.  On January 3, 2001 it was again the site of the championship, this time under the auspices of the Bowl Championship Series (Oklahoma over Florida State).

 

Year             Result

1935            Bucknell 26, Miami (FL) 0           

1936            Catholic U. 20, Mississippi 19           

1937            Duquesne 13, Mississippi St. 12           

1938            Auburn 6, Michigan St. 0           

1939            Tennessee 17, Oklahoma 0           

1940            Georgia Tech 21, Missouri 7           

1941            Mississippi St. 14, Georgetown 7           

1942            Georgia 40, TCU 26           

1943            Alabama 37, Boston College 21           

1944            LSU 19, Texas A&M 14           

1945            Tulsa 26, Georgia Tech 12           

1946            Miami (FL) 13, Holy Cross 6           

1947            Rice 8, Tennessee 0           

1948            Georgia Tech 20, Kansas 14           

1949            Texas 41, Georgia 28           

1950            Santa Clara 21, Kentucky 13           

1951            Clemson 15, Miami (FL) 14           

1952            Georgia Tech 17, Baylor 14           

1953            Alabama 61, Syracuse 6           

1954            Oklahoma 7, Maryland 0           

1955            Duke 34, Nebraska 7           

1956            Oklahoma 20, Maryland 6           

1957            Colorado 27, Clemson 21           

1958            Oklahoma 48, Duke 21           

1959            Oklahoma 21, Syracuse 6           

1960            Georgia 14, Missouri 0           

1961            Missouri 21, Navy 14           

1962            LSU 25, Colorado 7           

1963            Alabama 17, Oklahoma 0           

1964            Nebraska 13, Auburn 7           

1965            Texas 21, Alabama 17           

1966            Alabama 39, Nebraska 28           

1967            Florida 27, Georgia Tech 12           

1968            Oklahoma 26, Tennessee 24           

1969            Penn St. 15, Kansas 14           

1970            Penn St. 10, Missouri 3           

1971            Nebraska 17, LSU 12           

1972            Nebraska 38, Alabama 6           

1973            Nebraska 40, Notre Dame 6           

1974            Penn St. 16, LSU 9           

1975            Notre Dame 13, Alabama 11           

1976            Oklahoma 14, Michigan 6           

1977            Ohio St. 27, Colorado 10           

1978            Arkansas 31, Oklahoma 6           

1979            Oklahoma 31, Nebraska 24           

1980            Oklahoma 24, Florida St. 7           

1981            Oklahoma 18, Florida St. 17           

1982            Clemson 22, Nebraska 15           

1983            Nebraska 21, LSU 20           

1984            Miami (FL) 31, Nebraska 30           

1985            Washington 28, Oklahoma 17           

1986            Oklahoma 25, Penn St. 10           

1987            Oklahoma 42, Arkansas 8           

1988            Miami (FL) 20, Oklahoma 14           

1989            Miami (FL) 23, Nebraska 3           

1990            Notre Dame, 21, Colorado 6           

1991            Colorado 10, Notre Dame 9           

1992            Miami (FL) 22, Nebraska 0           

1993            Florida St. 27, Nebraska 14           

1994            Florida St. 18, Nebraska 16           

1995            Nebraska 24, Miami (FL) 17           

1996            Florida St. 31, Notre Dame 26           

1996            Nebraska 41, Virginia Tech 21           

1998            Nebraska 42, Tennessee 17           

1999            Florida 31, Syracuse 10           

2000            Michigan 35, Alabama 34           

2001            Oklahoma 13, Florida St. 2           

2002            Florida 56, Maryland 23           

2003            Southern Cal 38, Iowa 17           

2004            Miami (FL) 16, Florida St. 14           

2005            Southern Cal 55, Oklahoma 19           

2006            Penn St. 26, Florida St. 23 (OT)           

2007            Louisville 24, Wake Forest 13           

 

Cotton Bowl

Dallas, Texas

Capacity: 68,252

Date: January 1

 

The first Cotton Bowl was actually a post-season game between two high school teams on New Year’s Day, 1936. The following year, college teams replaced the high school teams. The game was originally played in Dallas's Fair Park Stadium. In 1938, it moved into its own stadium, which is named for the game.

Mobil Corporation sponsored the Cotton Bowl from 1988 through 1995. Since 1996, Southwestern Bell has been the sponsor. The Cotton Bowl was played on December 31 following the 1966 season. In all other years, it has taken place on January 1.

From the 1942 season through the 1994 season, the game matched the Southwestern Conference champion against an at-large opponent. Currently, teams from the Big 12 and the SEC participate in the Cotton Bowl. The folding of the SWC into the Big 12, however, has had the effect of reducing the game’s prestige. It is played early on New Year’s Day. Many late-rising West Coast revelers do not tune in until halftime if at all.

In the 1970s, however, it was the scene of major confrontations involving Notre Dame against Texas. In 1979 the Cotton Bowl featured an ailing Joe Montana forecasting the future when he led the Irish to an impossible comeback over Houston in freezing conditions. The weather is unpredictable in Dallas on New Year’s, ranging from balmy to icy.

 

Year            Result

1937            TCU 16, Marquette 6           

1938            Rice 28, Colorado 14           

1939            St. Mary's 20, Texas Tech 13           

1940            Clemson 6, Boston College 3           

1941            Texas A&M 13, Fordham 12           

1942            Alabama 29, Texas A&M 21           

1943            Texas 14, Georgia Tech 7           

1944            Texas 7, Randolph Field 7           

1945            Oklahoma A&M 34, TCU 0           

1946            Texas 40, Missouri 27           

1947            Arkansas 0, LSU 0           

1948            SMU 13, Penn St. 13           

1949            SMU 21, Oregon 13           

1950            Rice 27, N. Carolina 13           

1951            Tennessee 20, Texas 14           

1952            Kentucky 20, TCU 7           

1953            Texas 16, Tennessee 0           

1954            Rice 28, Alabama 6           

1955            Georgia Tech 14, Arkansas 6           

1956            Mississippi 14, TCU 13           

1957            TCU 28, Syracuse 27           

1958            Navy 20, Rice 7           

1959            0-0, TCU vs Air Force           

1960            Syracuse 23, Texas 14           

1961            Duke 7, Arkansas 6           

1962            Texas 12, Mississippi 7           

1963            LSU 13, Texas 0           

1964            Texas 28, Navy 6           

1965            Arkansas 10, Nebraska 7           

1966            LSU 14, Arkansas 7           

1966            Georgia 24, SMU 9           

1968            Texas A&M 20, Alabama 16           

1969            Texas 36, Tennessee 13           

1970            Texas 21, Notre Dame 17           

1971            Notre Dame 24, Texas 11           

1972            Penn St. 30, Texas 6           

1973            Texas 17, Alabama 13           

1974            Nebraska 19, Texas 3           

1975            Penn St. 41, Baylor 20           

1976            Arkansas 31, Georgia 10           

1977            Houston 30, Maryland 21           

1978            Notre Dame 38, Texas 10           

1979            Notre Dame 35, Houston 34           

1980            Houston 17, Nebraska 14           

1981            Alabama 30, Baylor 2           

1982            Texas 14, Alabama 12           

1983            SMU 7, Pittsburgh 3           

1984            Georgia 10, Texas 9           

1985            Boston College 45, Houston 28           

1986            Texas A&M 36, Auburn 16           

1987            Ohio St. 28, Texas A&M 12           

1988            Texas A&M 35, Notre Dame 10           

1989            UCLA 17, Arkansas 3           

1990            Tennessee 31, Arkansas 27           

1991            Miami (FL) 46, Texas 3           

1992            Florida St. 10, Texas A&M 2           

1993            Notre Dame 28, Texas A&M 3           

1994            Notre Dame 24, Texas A&M 21           

1995            USC 55, Texas Tech 14           

1996            Colorado 38, Oregon 6           

1997            BYU 19, Kansas St. 15           

1998            UCLA 29, Texas A&M 23           

1999            Texas 38, Mississippi St. 11           

2000            Arkansas 27, Texas 6           

2001            Kansas St. 35, Tennessee 21           

2002            Oklahoma 10, Arkansas 3           

2003            Texas 35, LSU 20           

2004            Mississippi 31, Oklahoma St. 28           

2005            Tennessee 38, Texas A&M 7           

2006            Alabama 13, Texas Tech 10           

2007             Auburn 17, Nebraska 14           

 

Fiesta Bowl

Tempe, Arizona (1971-2006)

Sun Devil Stadium (capacity: 73,379)

Glendale, Arizona (2007-present)

University of Phoenix Stadium (capacity: 63,000)

Date: January

 

The Fiesta Bowl is now a major post-season game. Played until 2006 in Arizona State's Sun Devil Stadium, it originally pitted Arizona State against an at-large rival in late December. Attendance hovered around the 50,000 mark until the game moved to January 1 after the 1981 season, when a Penn State-Southern California matchup drew more than 70,000. After the 1986 season, an epic national title showdown - Penn State over Miami - was held after New Year’s Day to create TV ratings. It was a bonanza, leading to this practice on a regular basis. The Fiesta Bowl's major status was further established when it became a member of the Bowl Alliance in 1992.

The Fiesta Bowl was sponsored by the Sunkist Citrus Growers from 1986 through 1991 and by IBM OS/2 from 1993 through 1995. Since 1996, Frito-Lay Tostitos chips has sponsored the game.

On January 4, 1999 the Fiesta Bowl hosted the first "national championship" game staged under the auspices of the Bowl Championship Series (won by Tennessee). It also hosted the championship game in 2003 (a thrilling overtime win by Ohio State over Miami).

In January 2007, the Fiesta Bowl was moved to University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, a Phoenix suburb and the new home of the Arizona Cardinals’ NFL franchise. The first game there was one of the greatest ever, Boise State’s improbable 43-42 overtime win over Oklahoma. One week later, Florida won the BCS national championship at this location, but the game was called the BCS national championship game, not the Fiesta Bowl. 

 

Year             Result

1971            Arizona St. 45, Florida St. 38           

1972            Arizona St. 49, Missouri 35           

1973            Arizona St. 28, Pittsburgh 7           

1974            Oklahoma St. 16, BYU 6           

1975            Arizona St. 17, Nebraska 14           

1976            Oklahoma 41, Wyoming 7           

1977            Penn St. 42, Arizona St. 30           

1978            Arkansas 10,  UCLA 10           

1979            Pittsburgh 16, Arizona 10           

1980            Penn St. 31, Ohio St. 19           

1982            Penn St. 26, USC 10           

1983            Arizona St. 32, Oklahoma 21           

1984            Ohio St. 28, Pittsburgh 23           

1985            UCLA 39, Miami (FL) 37           

1986            Michigan 27, Nebraska 23           

1987            Penn St. 14, Miami (FL) 10           

1988            Florida St. 31, Nebraska 28           

1989            Notre Dame 34, West Va. 21           

1990            Florida St. 41, Nebraska 17           

1991            Louisville 34, Alabama 7           

1992            Penn St. 42, Tennessee 17           

1993            Syracuse 26, Colorado 22           

1994            Arizona 29, Miami (FL) 0           

1995            Colorado 41, Notre Dame 24           

1996            Nebraska 62, Florida 24           

1997            Penn St. 38, Texas 15           

1997            Kansas St. 35, Syracuse 18           

1999            Tennessee 23, Florida St. 16           

2000            Nebraska 31, Tennessee 21           

2001            Oregon St. 41, Notre Dame 9           

2002            Oregon 38, Colorado 16           

2003            Ohio St. 31, Miami (FL) 24 (2OT)           

2004            Ohio State 35, Kansas State 28           

2005            Utah 35, Pittsburgh 7           

2006            Ohio St. 34, Notre Dame 20           

2007      Boise St. 43, Oklahoma 42           

 

Sugar Bowl

New Orleans, Louisiana

Tulane Stadium (capacity: 69,767), 1935-1974

Louisiana Superdome (capacity: 77,446), 1975-present

Date: January

 

First played in Tulane Stadium on January 1, 1935, the Sugar Bowl usually featured the SEC champion in its early years. That was formalized through an agreement with the conference during the 1946 season, which continued through the 1994 season.

In 1975, the Sugar Bowl moved to the new Louisiana Superdome, becoming the first (and still the only) major bowl game played indoors. In 1987 the Sugar Bowl also became the first major bowl game to accept corporate sponsorship, under an agreement with USF&G Financial Services, continuing through 1995. Nokia cellular telephones of Finland has sponsored the game since 1996.

As a member of the Bowl Alliance and Bowl Championship Series, the Sugar Bowl now hosts one of the top three post-season matchups. On January 3, 2000, it hosted the second annual championship game played under the auspices of the BCS (Florida State’s amazing win over Michael Vick and Virginia Tech).

 

Year             Result

1935            Tulane 20, Temple 14           

1936            TCU 3, LSU 2           

1937            Santa Clara 21, LSU 14           

1938            Santa Clara 6, LSU 0           

1939            TCU 15, Carnegie Tech 7           

1940            Texas A&M 14, Tulane 13           

1941            Boston College 19, Tennessee 13           

1942            Fordham 2, Missouri 0           

1943            Tennessee 14, Tulsa 7           

1944            Georgia Tech 20, Tulsa 18           

1945            Duke 29, Alabama 26           

1946            Okla. A&M 33, St.Mary's 13           

1947            Georgia 20, N. Carolina 10           

1948            Texas 27, Alabama 7           

1949            Oklahoma 14, N. Carolina 6           

1950            Oklahoma 35, LSU 0           

1951            Kentucky 13, Oklahoma 7           

1952            Maryland 28, Tennessee 13           

1953            Georgia Tech 24, Mississippi 7           

1954            Georgia Tech 42, West Va. 19           

1955            Navy 21, Mississippi 0           

1956            Georgia Tech 7, Pittsburgh 0           

1957            Baylor 13, Tennessee 7           

1958            Mississippi 39, Texas 7           

1959            LSU 7, Clemson 0           

1960            Mississippi 21, LSU 0           

1961            Mississippi 14, Rice 6           

1962            Alabama 10, Arkansas 3           

1963            Mississippi 17, Arkansas 13           

1964            Alabama 12, Mississippi 7           

1965            LSU 13, Syracuse 10           

1966            Missouri 20, Florida 18           

1967            Alabama 34, Nebraska 7           

1968            LSU 20, Wyoming 13           

1969            Arkansas 16, Georgia 2           

1970            Mississippi 27, Arkansas 22           

1971            Tennessee 34, Air Force 13           

1972            Oklahoma 40, Auburn 22           

1972            Oklahoma 14, Penn St. 0           

1973            Notre Dame 24, Alabama 23           

1974            Nebraska 13, Florida 10           

1975            Alabama 13, Penn St. 6           

1977            Pittsburgh 27, Georgia 3           

1978            Alabama 35, Ohio St. 6           

1979            Alabama 14, Penn St. 7           

1980            Alabama 24, Arkansas 9           

1981            Georgia 17, Notre Dame 10           

1982            Pittsburgh 24, Georgia 20           

1983            Penn St. 27, Georgia 23           

1984            Auburn 9, Michigan 7           

1985            Nebraska 28, LSU 10           

1986            Tennessee 35, Miami (FL) 7           

1987            Nebraska 30, LSU 15           

1988            Syracuse 16, Auburn 16           

1989            Florida St. 13, Auburn 7           

1990            Miami (FL) 33, Alabama 25           

1991            Tennessee 23, Virginia 22           

1992            Notre Dame 39, Florida 28           

1993            Alabama 34, Miami (FL) 13           

1994            Florida 41, West Va. 7           

1995            Florida St. 23, Florida 17           

1995            Va. Tech 28, Texas 10           

1997            Florida 52, Florida St. 20           

1998            Florida St. 31, Ohio St. 14           

1999            Ohio St. 24, Texas A&M 14           

2000            Florida St. 46, Va. Tech 29           

2001            Miami (FL) 37, Florida 20           

2002            LSU 47, Illinois 34           

2003            Georgia 26, Florida St. 13           

2004            LSU 21, Oklahoma 14           

2005            Auburn 16, Virginia Tech 13           

2006            West Virginia 38, Georgia 35           

2007    LSU 41, Notre Dame 14