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Salman Rushdie's Books

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Sep.18.2012
On February 14, 1989, Valentine’s Day, Salman Rushdie was telephoned by a BBC journalist and told that he had been “sentenced to death” by the Ayatollah Khomeini. For the first time he heard the word fatwa. His crime? To have written a novel called The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being “against Islam, the Prophet and the Quran.”   So begins the extraordinary story...
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Jun.01.2011
With the same dazzling imagination and love of language that have made Salman Rushdie one of the great storytellers of our time, Luka and the Fire of Life revisits the magic-infused, intricate world he first brought to life in the modern classic Haroun and the Sea of Stories. This breathtaking new novel centers on Luka, Haroun's younger brother, who must save his father from...
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Apr.08.2008
The Enchantress of Florence is the story of a mysterious woman, a great beauty believed to possess the powers of enchantment and sorcery, attempting to command her own destiny in a man’s world. It is the story of two cities at the height of their powers–the hedonistic Mughal capital, in which the brilliant emperor Akbar the Great wrestles daily with questions of belief, desire, and...
Shalimar the Clown
Oct.10.2006
For Westerners, this book may be better heard than read. While readers might stumble over the Kashmiri, Indian and Pakistani names and accents, Mandvi glides right through them, allowing us to engage with Rushdie’s well-wrought characters and sagas. Mandvi has a calm, quiet storyteller voice, often employing tempo to express emotional states and to make long, complex sentences...
Step Across This Line: Collected Nonfiction 1992-2002
Sep.01.2003
From one of the great novelists of our day, a vital, brilliant new book of essays, speeches, and articles essential for our times.
The Jaguar Smile: A Nicaraguan Journey
Aug.01.2003
In this brilliantly focused and haunting portrait of the people, the politics, the land, and the poetry of Nicaragua, Salman Rushdie brings to the forefront the palpable human facts of a country in the midst of a revolution. Rushdie went to Nicaragua in 1986, harboring no preconceptions of what he might find. What he discovered was overwhelming: a culture of heroes who had turned...
Fury
Sep.01.2001
Fury is a work of explosive energy, at once a pitiless and pitch-black comedy, a profoundly disturbing inquiry into the darkest side of human nature, and a love story of mesmerizing force. It is also an astonishing portrait of New York. Not since the Bombay of Midnight’s Children have a time and place been so intensely and accurately captured in a novel. In his eighth novel,...
Salman Rushdie Interviews: A Sourcebook of His Ideas
Apr.30.2001
Pradyumna S. Chauhan collects and annotates published and broadcast interviews with Salman Rushdie to deliver the author's comments about his art and harrowed life, the state of politics, and the creative process.
Midnight's Children
Jan.01.2001
Saleem Sinai is born at the stroke of midnight on August 15th, 1947, the very moment of India’s independence. Greeted by fireworks displays, cheering crowds, and Prime Minister Nehru himself, Saleem grows up to learn the ominous consequences of this coincidence. His every act is mirrored and magnified in events that sway the course of national affairs; his health and well-being are...
Shame
Dec.01.2000
In this brilliant novel, Salman Rushdie masterfully combines history, art, language, politics, and religion. Set in a country “not quite Pakistan,” the story centers around the families of two men—one a celebrated warrior, the other, a debauched playboy engaged in a protracted duel that is played out in the political landscape of their country. Shame is a tour de force and a...
Conversations with Salman Rushdie
Jul.01.2000
Acclaim, success, and controversy follow every one of Salman Rushdie’s writings. His novels and stories have won him awards and made him both famous in the literary world and a catalyst for protests worldwide. For nearly a decade after publication of The Satanic Verses, he faced a bounty on his life. Although Rushdie has participated in a great number of interviews, many of his...
Ground beneath Her Feet
Mar.01.2000
In this remaking of the myth of Orpheus, Rushdie tells the story of Vina Apsara, a pop star, and Ormus Cama, an extraordinary songwriter and musician, who captivate and change the world through their music and their romance. Beginning in Bombay in the fifties, moving to London in the sixties, and New York for the last quarter century, the novel pulsates with a half-century of music...
Moor's Last Sigh
Jan.01.1997
The Moor evokes his family's often grotesque but compulsively moving fortunes and the lost world of possibilities embodied by India in this century. His is a tale of premature deaths and family rifts, of thwarted loves and mad passions, of secrecy and greed, of power and money, and of the even more morally dubious seductions and mysteries of art.
East, West
Dec.01.1995
From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Satanic Verses comes nine stories that reveal the oceanic distances and the unexpected intimacies between East and West. Daring, extravagant, comical, and humane, this book renews Rushdie’s stature as a storyteller who can enthrall and instruct us with the same sentence.
Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism, 1981-1991
May.01.1992
Rushdie here is at his most candid, impassioned, and incisive—an important and moving record of one writer’s intellectual and personal odyssey. These seventy-five essays demonstrate Rushdie’s range and prophetic vision, as he focuses on his fellow writers, on films, and on the mine-strewn ground of race, politics, and religion.