where the writers are
The Summer We Fell Apart
The Summer We Fell Apart
$14.99
Paperback
See Book Details »

BOOK DETAILS

  • Paperback
  • Jan.05.2010
  • 9780061782169

Robin gives an overview of the book:

Every family is crazy in their own special way, and the Haas family is no exception. The Summer We Fell Apart is the story of four siblings: Amy, George, Kate, and Finn as they careen into adulthood, trying to make peace with their past, and with each other.  As the children of a once brilliant playwright and a struggling actress, the Haas siblings were raised in a chaotic environment, abandoned into a shadowy adult world made up of equal parts glamour and neglect. When their father dies, they must depend on their intense but fragile bond to remember what it means to be family despite years of anger and hurt. From Amy’s adolescent yearnings for a "normal" life to George’s search for love and Kate’s struggle to not always be perfect, to the gritty details of Finn’s addictive and destructive behavior, the Haas children...
Read full overview »

Every family is crazy in their own special way, and the Haas family is no exception. The Summer We Fell Apart is the story of four siblings: Amy, George, Kate, and Finn as they careen into adulthood, trying to make peace with their past, and with each other. 

As the children of a once brilliant playwright and a struggling actress, the Haas siblings were raised in a chaotic environment, abandoned into a shadowy adult world made up of equal parts glamour and neglect. When their father dies, they must depend on their intense but fragile bond to remember what it means to be family despite years of anger and hurt. From Amy’s adolescent yearnings for a "normal" life to George’s search for love and Kate’s struggle to not always be perfect, to the gritty details of Finn’s addictive and destructive behavior, the Haas children come to learn that this family --  no matter how ragged and flawed -provides all the hope they need.

Read an excerpt »

Part I

Amy

I. You Are Not You, Yet

The summer we took in a boarder my mother started wearing headscarves. They were adorned with elaborate patterns and colors as if a fistful of crayons had melted on her head. Often she wore more than one at a time twisted around each other and tied low at the nape of her neck so a plume of silk cascaded down her back. The scarves swayed from side to side as she walked, like the dragons in the New Year’s Parade in Chinatown. They were so odd an affectation that it prompted our boarder Miriam to ask me if my mother was sick. Miriam was from Switzerland and spoke French with only a minimum of English, so she pronounced the word sick as seeeck  and it took me a few moments to understand what she was asking. I was left to shrug and roll my eyes as if to say: parents? Who can explain them? Truth was I had no explanation for the scarves, although I guessed they were probably a result of my mother getting home late from the theater with mussed up dirty hair. She was in a play in New York that required her to wear a wig - some depressing Bertoldt Brecht thing. My mother was excited about it because she thought it lent her credibility as an actor. My brother George and I had used her comp opening night tickets not so much to see our mother but to see the stage debut of a TV actor George thought was hot.

robin-antalek's picture

Note from the author coming soon...

About Robin

Robin Antalek has been published in numerous literary journals and has twice been a finalist in Glimmer Train's Family Matters and Short Story Award for New Writers Contests as well as a finalist in the Bellingham Review's Tobias Wolff Award for Fiction and the Hudson...

Read full bio »