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Native America, Discovered and COnquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, and Manifest Destiny
$59.94
Hardcover
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BOOK DETAILS

  • Hardcover
  • Sep.30.2006
  • 9780275990114
  • Praeger Publishers

Robert gives an overview of the book:

Manifest Destiny, as a term for westward expansion, was not used until the 1840s. Its predecessor was the Doctrine of Discovery, a legal tradition by which Europeans and Americans laid legal claim to the land of the indigenous people that they "discovered." In the United States, the British colonists who had recently become Americans were competing with the English, French, and Spanish for control of lands west of the Mississippi. Who would be the "discoverers" of the Indians and their lands, the United States or the European countries? We know the answer, of course, but in this book, Miller explains for the first time exactly how the United States achieved victory, not only on the ground, but also in the developing legal thought of the day.
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Manifest Destiny, as a term for westward expansion, was not used until the 1840s. Its predecessor was the Doctrine of Discovery, a legal tradition by which Europeans and Americans laid legal claim to the land of the indigenous people that they "discovered." In the United States, the British colonists who had recently become Americans were competing with the English, French, and Spanish for control of lands west of the Mississippi. Who would be the "discoverers" of the Indians and their lands, the United States or the European countries? We know the answer, of course, but in this book, Miller explains for the first time exactly how the United States achieved victory, not only on the ground, but also in the developing legal thought of the day.

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Note from the author coming soon...

About Robert

Robert Miller is a Professor at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon where he teaches Indian Law courses and Civil Procedure. He has taught and practiced Indian law since 1993. He has also been a part-time tribal judge since 1995 and is now the Chief Justice of...

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