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The Making of the Atomic Bomb
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Richard gives an overview of the book:

This massive work deals with the history of the people and the science that preceded and then made possible the development of the atomic bomb. Heavily biographical, the book provides portraits of the many players from Leo Szilard and Albert Einstein to Robert Oppenheimer. Rhodes includes detailed explanations of the various scientific discoveries beginning in the late nineteenth century which culminated in the Manhattan Project. The book is heavily documented and includes a thirteen-page bibliography. This is a definitive work, well written, with a gripping story.
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This massive work deals with the history of the people and the science that preceded and then made possible the development of the atomic bomb. Heavily biographical, the book provides portraits of the many players from Leo Szilard and Albert Einstein to Robert Oppenheimer. Rhodes includes detailed explanations of the various scientific discoveries beginning in the late nineteenth century which culminated in the Manhattan Project. The book is heavily documented and includes a thirteen-page bibliography. This is a definitive work, well written, with a gripping story.

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About Richard

RICHARD RHODES's most recent book is Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World. Rhodes is the author or editor of twenty-four books including The Making of the Atomic Bomb, which won a Pulitzer Prize...

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Published Reviews

Dec.13.2007

This book is a major work of historical synthesis that brings to life the men and machines that gave us the nuclear era. Rich in drama and suspense, The Making of the Atomic Bomb also has...

Oct.28.2007

[O]nce you get into the details of Why They Kill, you find yourself both surprised by some of its conclusions and mesmerized by its narrative. The book is not so much a summing up of the theories...