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Divorce
The Divorce Handbook
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Rajesh gives an overview of the book:

This book explains simply and clearly the various legal procedures which govern marriage and divorce amongst different religious communities. Divorce is a traumatic affair, not only for the couple concerned and their children; often even their respective parents, brothers and sisters get dragged into a messy, bitter and prolonged dispute. Then, too, rarely do divorce seekers realise what all it involves; typically lawyers don't give you the full picture right in the beginning and even if they do, the implications don't always sink in. This book is essential reading for anyone who may be contemplating marriage or divorce. It is equally useful for marriage counsellors and social workers for the clear perspective it offers about the options and legal rights pertaining to marriage and divorce - minus all the daunting legal jargon.
Read full overview »

This book explains simply and clearly the various legal procedures which govern marriage and divorce amongst different religious communities. Divorce is a traumatic affair, not only for the couple concerned and their children; often even their respective parents, brothers and sisters get dragged into a messy, bitter and prolonged dispute. Then, too, rarely do divorce seekers realise what all it involves; typically lawyers don't give you the full picture right in the beginning and even if they do, the implications don't always sink in.

This book is essential reading for anyone who may be contemplating marriage or divorce. It is equally useful for marriage counsellors and social workers for the clear perspective it offers about the options and legal rights pertaining to marriage and divorce - minus all the daunting legal jargon.

Read an excerpt »

Is there a best way to get divorced? Yes. According to me the best way to get divorced is by mutual consent. It is the best way, because it is graceful (to the extent possible) and it dissolves the marriage expeditiously and enables both parties to make a fresh start in life. Otherwise not only do divorce cases drag on for years and years, all too often it involves mud slinging, and hurling accusations and counter accusations at each other. I am by no means suggesting that a party unwilling to grant divorce to his or her spouse is unjustified in doing so. You may be perfectly justified, both morally and legally, when you refuse to grant divorce to your spouse. Bear in mind however that in contested cases, all too often, divorce proceedings which were initiated when the parties were in their youth culminate only when middle age has set in. Such delays take place in spite of the fact that the law clearly places a duty on the Courts to decide matrimonial cases expeditiously. For example, Section 21 B of the Hindu Marriage Act provides that ‘ the trial of a petition under the Act shall so far as practicable be continued from day to day until its conclusion.’ It further provides that the Court shall endeavor to conclude the trial within six months from the date of service of notice of the petition on the opposite party. Despite these directives matrimonial cases often take many years to conclude. 

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About Rajesh

Rajesh Talwar is mainly a writer. He has practised law for many years, taught at University and worked for the United Nations in Somalia, Liberia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and now Timor-Leste. He writes fiction (novels, plays, children's books) and well as non fiction (human...

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