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Sherlock Holmes and the Impulsive Vampire
Murder on the Impulsive

Book 3 in the Sherlock Holmes: The Skull of Kohada Koheiji novelettes series.

In this third story of the first series, Holmes has to deal with a vampire infesting a Royal Navy battleship at anchor in the Thames. Told in the classic style, with Doctor Watson narrating, we see Holmes faced with the exsanguination of a senior officer of Her Majesty's Royal Navy: a monstrous state of affairs.

"This Agency stands flat-footed upon the ground and there it must remain. The world is big enough for us. No ghost need apply."

The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire, Arthur Conan Doyle.  

 

Sherlock Holmes is, of course, the arch rationalist, but his creator claimed to speak with the dead.

Conan Doyle, a medical man steeped in empirical reasoning at Edinburgh University and the creator of the super-logical detective, was fascinated, from his mid-twenties on, by Spiritualism, early experiments in thought transference and healing through mesmerism. He spent the last years of his life writing and lecturing on those subjects.

Doyle was first introduced to Spiritualism between 1885 and 1888 when he was invited to the home of one of his patients, General Drayson, a teacher at Greenwich Naval College. The medium was a railway signalman. Doyle was amazed by some of the paranormal activity he experienced, but he was no fool; he thought the other sitters at the séances naive and gullible. Nevertheless, he was intrigued, and he used his skills of deductive reasoning to investigate the possibility of communion with the dead.

In this second story of the first series, Holmes has to deal with a vampire infesting a Royal Navy battleship at anchor in the Thames. Told in the classic style, with Doctor Watson narrating, we see Holmes faced with the exsanguination of a senior officer of Her Majesty's Royal Navy: a monstrous state of affairs.  This ebook is available from Amazon on Kindle.