where the writers are
Response to Keiko Amano
MaraBuck-c77

     Forgive me for posting this as a blog rather than as a comment, but I didn’t know any other way to share an image of my own art.  Keiko, thank you so much for introducing us to Kumada Chikabo, an extraordinary human being.  I had been depressed concerning my work and reading the interview with this wise man was like listening to the voice of a mentor.  “I am like a leaf, floating down a stream.”

     Some time ago I focused on painting the intricate details of the animals around me.  These baby iguanas were done in the Yucatan, for instance.  Kumada Chikabo has reminded me that perhaps it is time again to focus on that which is close at hand. 

     For those of you who missed Keiko’s link to the interview, I urge you to click on http://make.pingmag.jp/2008/09/30/kumada/ .   It is a lovely way to begin your week.     Thank you again, Keiko.

Comments
6 Comment count
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Wow, that's beautifully

Wow, that's beautifully done! What sort of materials did you use to create your work? Just curious. :) Amazing.

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Watercolor and spit

  Thanks so much, Ryoma.  I used tube watercolors, India ink and probably spit since I was on the beach in the Yucatan and fresh water was scarce.  I painted a whole sketchbook full, and now Keiko’s post has inspired me to return to detailed studies once again.    

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Just added

Ryoma, I just added 10 more drawings to my media page if you’d like to see others.

Thanks for looking, Mara

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Hi Mara

Not being a writer or artist, I am always amazed by what writer's and artists achieve, bringing to life, and indeed in many cases, injecting their own life, into their craft. I love how you have captured these wonderful animals in a moment in time, in your sketchbook.

It makes me think of Jack Hillier (one of the world's foremost experts on Japanese Art), Gina's mentor until his passing in '95. When he was serving in the desert campaigns with the British Army during the Second World War, he drew the animals and insects that he saw and included them in his correspondence to his wife, Mary.  They were wonderful. He was very talented.

Thank you for sharing. :)

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Thank you for mentioning the

Thank you for mentioning the other work you have uploaded. The work is very different from the art I normally look at so I hope you do not find my comments naive.

This is meant as a compliment, I found them very shocking and heartbreaking. The emotion that exudes from your work is very powerful. I hope it is not inappropriate to make such comments about someone else's work when there has not been an invitation to do so. It's just that, as you shared them with the world, I felt compelled to let you know how the work made me feel.

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Exactly the response

Exactly the response that mirrored my own during the collapse of the World Trade Center.  I was here in Maine that day, watching on TV.  I felt so inadequate that all I could do was draw.  My emotions guided the pastels in an autonomic fashion, faster and faster while the towers fell.  It is a great compliment that today you felt that same shock and heartbreak through my work.  (I write about this in a poem I posted 9/11/09.)  Art should always compel a response or it’s merely a greeting card.

I also trained in art history.  I think Gina and I will have much to discuss!

Peace, Mara