where the writers are
The Match Makers
Not available.

Malissa gives an overview of the book:

In this fairy tale retelling, Rumpelstiltskin turns self-centered teenage princesses into well-rounded young women fit to find their One True Love--princes supplied by the Fairy Godmother. Just as a Cinderella-cycle is being completed, Rumpelstiltskin--or Rasp, as others call him--is called to pick up a new princess, the first-born daughter of a woman who Rasp had completed spinning assignments for years ago. At twenty-six, the new princess is older than any other princess he’s accepted into his training. And she knows his name. Blending traditional Rumpelstiltskin stories from many different cultures, this short story is a delightful riff on the fairy tales that were ingrained in our culture long before Disney or the Brothers Grimm.
Read full overview »

In this fairy tale retelling, Rumpelstiltskin turns self-centered teenage princesses into well-rounded young women fit to find their One True Love--princes supplied by the Fairy Godmother. Just as a Cinderella-cycle is being completed, Rumpelstiltskin--or Rasp, as others call him--is called to pick up a new princess, the first-born daughter of a woman who Rasp had completed spinning assignments for years ago. At twenty-six, the new princess is older than any other princess he’s accepted into his training. And she knows his name.

Blending traditional Rumpelstiltskin stories from many different cultures, this short story is a delightful riff on the fairy tales that were ingrained in our culture long before Disney or the Brothers Grimm.

Read an excerpt »

“I’m here to rescue the princess,” the prince said when Rasp opened the door. The young man was stereotypically handsome—the tall and dark kind—and had a perfectly polished sword pointed at Rasp’s chest.

Rasp could already hear the scuttling from deeper inside the house. “I’m sorry,” he said sweetly. “There’s no princess here.”

The prince frowned. “This is the Hunting Forest of Aimreux, is it not?” he asked, shifting slightly. His sword caught the light of the noon sun, nearly blinding Rasp.

“By the brothers, get that out of my face!” Rasp spat, hitting the flat of the blade with one hand to force it down. The prince let the point drop to the ground, though his alert stance didn’t waver. Rasp sighed. Might as well get on with the formalities. “Indeed, this is the Hunting Forest of Aimreux.” He stressed the correct pronunciation: em-ruh. “And what is the most important part of that name, boy?”

The prince shrugged. “Aimreux?” He pronounced it aim-rucks. Again.

Rasp sighed. “Where has your fairy godmother been? The most important part of the name is Hunting. You can’t just come here and expect to be handed a princess. You have to hunt for her.”

“Is this some sort of trick? I’ve heard you often play tricks on princes. I believe you have a princess with you now, and my hunt can stop here.”

“Oh, yes!” a high-pitch voice cried. Rasp caught Elspeth around the waist as she tried throwing herself out the door. Her beauty was stereotypical enough to match the prince’s: a perfect hourglass shape, blonde hair that reached her calves, and blue eyes that recently seemed wiser and more thoughtful. Most of the time.

malissa-kent's picture

Note from the author coming soon...

About Malissa

I've been a reader for as long as I can remember, and a writer for nearly as long. I loved escaping into the adventures of the novels I read, so it didn't take much for me to start writing my own. My passion is genre fiction, especially Fantasy, and my novels tend to be of...

Read full bio »

Author's Publishing Notes

I don't remember how the genesis of this story came about, other than that I was washing dishes at the time. It was one of those stories that strike suddenly and scorch your mind until you start writing, then tend to back away quickly and leave you to your own devices. I wanted it to be funny, but also authentic, so I hunted around the internet to find Rumpelstiltskin fairy tales in other cultures, finding far more than I'd imagined, including some that didn't involve child-stealing at all, but were just bargains between two women (yes, Rumpelstiltskin is a woman in some cultures!). This is my own interpretation of all those fairy tales.