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Lauren Lise Baratz-Logsted's Blog

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Mar.12.2013
  The Moment I Tried To Talk My Way Into a Part-time Job To Support My Writing Habit: Having realized I wasn’t going to sell Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes right away, and that I’d have to write a second book, I further realized that I needed to make some money to help pay the mortgage while I...
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Mar.10.2013
  The Moment I Realized Why My First Book Wasn’t Selling: So, after parting company with Agent 1, I continued pitching Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes on my own to editors. An editor would say they were willing to look and, inevitably, the editor would reject, often using the most glowing of...
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Mar.09.2013
  The Moment It Was Confirmed For Me Just How Nuts Big Cheese Was: Sister 1, the editor I knew who worked for a New York publisher, called me up to see how things were going with Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes, so I told her what had happened with the agent known as Big Cheese. Sister 1 said she...
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Mar.08.2013
  The Moment I Realized Big Cheese Was Nuts: After signing the contract in New York, Big Cheese sent me revision notes on changes she thought I should make to Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes to get it into better shape so she could send it out on submission. She thought that too many characters...
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Mar.07.2013
  The Moment I Met The Big Cheese: As luck would have it, Big-Cheese Agent was coming to New York to meet with some editors and she asked if I could come into the city and meet her at her hotel so we could talk about Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes. So, of course, I went. My husband accompanied...
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Mar.06.2013
  The Moment I Had To Choose Between Two Agents: After writing many queries and/or using my too-handy friend, The Phone, I finally got an offer of representation for Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes. Actually, I got two offers...on the same day. Ah, what to do, what to do? As luck would have it,...
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Mar.05.2013
The Moment I Realized I Hadn’t Sold My First Book: Sister 2, the editorial director who’d said she was laughing on every page of Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes and whose sister had said she was sure Sister 2 was going to acquire the book, phoned me up. This time, she wasn’t laughing. Instead, in a...
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Mar.04.2013
  The Moment I Thought I Sold My First Book: A woman who had been one of my customers when I worked at the bookstore just happened to be an editorial bigwig at FSG and later Random, so I sent her a copy of Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes. She thought it was funny and had some good editorial...
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Mar.03.2013
  The Moment I Received My First Rejection: Concerning Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes, the assistant to Larry Ashmead from Harper sent me a letter that read, in part, “You have the talent and wit to become the next Molly [Ivins] or Erma [Bombeck]” but then went on to say that, no, they would not...
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Mar.02.2013
The Moment I Thought It Was OK To Just Call An Editor Up On The Phone: I got the phone number for Harper and dialed the main office, asked to speak to the legendary editor Larry Ashmead. When he picked up the phone, I pitched Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes to him. In a world-weary gravel voice, he...
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Mar.01.2013
  The Moment I Finished My First Novel: It was the middle of January 1995. Previously, I’d averaged three pages a day of writing but on that day, I finished Waiting for Dead Men’s Shoes in a 15-page dash. I’d never written so much in one day in my life and as I typed the last five pages, tears...
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Feb.28.2013
  The Moment I Realized I Was Not Going To Write The Great American Novel: I always thought that when I did finally get serious about writing, I would write, well, serious stuff. After all, it’s not like I’d spent my entire life reading Judith Krantz; or at least not just Judith Krantz. In...
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Feb.27.2013
  The Moment I Decided To Take A Chance On Myself As A Writer: I’d always said that if 30 consecutive days passed without me being happy in my job as a bookseller, I’d quit. Over an 11-year period, there were times I came close to that number, but then something good would happen and I’d fall...
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Feb.26.2013
  The Moment I First Realized Booksellers Are Not Always Excited To See Authors: I spent the better part of the 11 years between 1983 and 1994 working as an independent bookseller. My manager liked to tell the story about how, when she was still green in the job, a local author came in...
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Feb.25.2013
  The Moment I Realized People Didn’t Have To Like Me To Like What I Wrote: In high school, I wasn’t so much unpopular as I was nonpopular. Look through my high school yearbooks and, except for class pictures, it’s hard to find evidence that I even existed in those years. That’s OK – being on...
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