where the writers are

Lauren Lise Baratz-Logsted's Blog

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May.06.2012
If you treat your writing like a hobby and don’t place value on it, how can you expect others in your life to?
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May.05.2012
When you’re a writer, the microwave is your best friend – so stop using cooking as an excuse not to write.
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May.04.2012
When you’re a writer, so long as nothing is actively crawling, your home is clean enough – so stop using housekeeping as an excuse not to write.  
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May.03.2012
If another author blurbs your book, do not thank that person on your Acknowledgments page for being such a good friend and supporter, because that will render the blurb near useless, just one evolutionary step away from saying, “Hey, my mom likes my book!”
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May.02.2012
Unlike professional athletes with 100-million-dollar contracts, when frustrated you will not punch your fist through the glass case of a fire-extinguisher, because unlike them you always remember that your hands are your business and without them, you cannot write; you will also not, in frustration...
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May.01.2012
For those with kids who worry that you’re shortchanging your kids when you work on your writing, remember that one of the greatest gifts you can give a child is the model of someone pursuing dreams with hard work, joy and determination; by doing so, you increase the odds that when they grow up,...
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Apr.30.2012
There’s nothing wholly new under the writing sun, so try not to get discouraged when you discover that someone else is working on something that strikes you as somehow similar to what you’re working on – your job is simply to make your book as good and original as you can make it; you can do that,...
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Apr.29.2012
When you’re on a panel with other writers, try not to be one of the many who spend the entire time telling their co-panelists how unfair and awful everything to do with writing and publishing is; frankly, you negative people are getting on my nerves. The following note repeats once every 30 days:...
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Apr.28.2012
You may be a plotter, you may be a pantser – either method is valid; but if you’re a pantser who for some reason suddenly needs to be a plotter, Christopher Vogler’s The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers can be an invaluable tool.
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Apr.27.2012
When speaking to kids, remember: Yes, it’s nice to sell some books, but you also have an opportunity to shoot for something higher here, maybe even save an emotional life or two, so quit worrying about your bottom line and do something special instead.  
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Apr.26.2012
When getting ready to speak about your writing to a group at a bookstore, library, school or conference, try not to work yourself into a tizzy or any other kind of negative state; remember, it’s a receptive audience and these people actually want to hear what you have to say (unless of course it’s...
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Apr.25.2012
If you show up for an event – library, school, bookstore, what-have-you – and immediately it becomes apparent that the hosts have not done whatever you’ve been promised, maintain a professional and cheerful face for those in attendance because they’re not at fault and have no idea what’s going on;...
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Apr.24.2012
Every writer has one of three basic weaknesses: bad starts, saggy middles, weak endings – all need attention but the one that is the most detrimental is the first because if your start is poor, how many will still be reading when you get brilliant later on?
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Apr.23.2012
As I write this, it’s Shakespeare’s birthday, and it’s worth noting that even the Bard had his critics; some said, paraphrasing wildly here, “When he sees the finish line, he races for it!” – so, if at all possible, try not to write too much like Shakespeare, because, after all, you don’t want to...
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Apr.22.2012
Sometimes, when the words aren’t coming, there’s a temptation to sit staring at the screen until they do – and certainly, butt-in-chair is the only way to get a book finished – but sometimes it’s wiser to get outside and take a walk, or even a run, just clear your head as you take in the wider...
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