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No More Hunger Strikes Anywhere, Please
むむむのむ  m in "Mmm"  by Iida Kazuko Sensei

Don’t you think hunger-strike is outmoded style of protest?

No, it’s highly effective. Peaceful method is better than violent one. We are peaceful people.

If we starve ourselves, we’ll die. No one in the great tsunami survived after three days in cold without food. Is he okay?

He sprints like a young man after four days of fasting. He is 74. He is not an ordinary man.

If he died young, he would be unable to lead this important anti-corruption movement. Don’t you worry about his health?

If he died, the masses become violent.

That will prove the people are violent.

No, that won’t happen. Only a few can do this.

Do those few live only in your country?

Mmm

If we want corruption to stop, we have to remain honest, don’t you agree?

Hunger Strike is peaceful mean. Not like Libya.

Mmm

It’s non-violence.

I think hunger strike and bribe are similar at the root. They both threaten.

There is a need of a change in the system. When we face a huge social problem, a drastic measure can be employed. This is a case in point. People think he is a saint.

If he were a saint, don’t you worry a lot about his health?

When fasting is combined with spiritual power it strengthens rather than weaken.

You mean he becomes stronger as he gets hungrier?

Yes! And people become hungrier for a huge social change!! People become POWERFUL!!!

Don’t you worry about his health?

Comments
13 Comment count
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fiction

After I reseached about hunger strikes on the web, I was surprised to find so many people around the world have attempted, and many became sick or died. This post is the result of this small reseach and also inspired from my fellow blogger's post and our comments. This post is fiction.

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Aye!

Keiko:

Even if this is fiction, we in India are living through this utter nonsense. It is bribing, blackmail and arrogance. I hate it and have met with so much resistance due to my views. I am cynical and someone even said I am a bitch. Only because I do not believe you need to rally around a 'saint', who none of these posh acitivists knew about till the other day, to stall corruption. This is nonsense, but Indians love this business of fasting for a cause.

Don't know whether you had read this, on a related subject: Death be not loud

~F

 

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cynical and bitch?

Farzana,

You are doing a good job. I'm behind you. Thank you for the post. I read it, and I am very surprised. I had no idea.
I'm just speechless.

The teaching of the middle way was originated in India, travelled to China, went to Korea, and finally came to Japan more than 1000 years ago. I wonder what happened to it in India? We say extreme is no good to remind ourselves not to go overboard on something we are very focused . My goodness, 250 monks died in a year?! I have to think about this. We need to save people from dying for sure.

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Death be not loud

Farzana,

Your blog contained many words I didn't know, so I went back with my dictionary and read it again.
What disturbed me the most was the words "no choice." It's frustrating because we do have choice.
But that's easier to say than done. To retain choice in my life, I still need to work at it.

If anyone call you such names, let them know they'll find many like minded
people here and Japan, and I'm sure in other countries.

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Paths

Keiko:

Choice is a luxury, and when one cannto bring about change, then there is helplessness. Also, what is good for one may not be so for another. Some of us do stick our necks out, and being identifiable, it is easy to be berated. What I reveal here is just the skimmed surface.

I am not a fan of the middle path, except in philosophical terms. It is important to take a stand. Maybe that is a choice we make. But does it change anything?

Thank you for being a kindred spirit.

~F

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the middle path

Farzana,

I see. Taking a stand and the middle path contradict from the taking-a-stand perspective. It’s a constant internal struggle for me. Besides, if I haven’t experienced both extremes yet, I wouldn’t have a good middle path.

Separately, I think of the middle path as internal checkpoints, and it’s relative. I appreciate your posts because it’s clear that you take courageous stand, but I also deeply appreciate your carefulness, diplomacy, going out of your way to describe and explain, being patient and fair, and follow up on comments with deep thoughts. In my opinion, that’s a manifestation of the middle path.

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If anyone call you such

If anyone call you such names, let them know they'll find many like minded
people here and Japan, and I'm sure in other countries.

Keiko, here too,many people like me do not think of her in that way even after not agreeing with her always. Ours is a country with full complexity and confusions. We change our stands for topic to topic as per our convenience. More or less every one in the world is practicing this.

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complexity and confusion

Jitu,

I appreciate your comment. I just checked the web and found the following paragraphs. I’m very concerned about what comes next.

“The forum styled Students-Teachers-Professionals-Public at the Shaheed Minar on Wednesday threatened that it would announce countrywide token and mass hunger strikes in phases if Syed Abul Hossain was not removed by Sept 13.”

“Dhaka University teacher Rubayet Ferdous told reporters that they would go for fast-unto-death if prime minister Sheikh Hasina did not sack the minister.”

Jitu, I think non-violence is relative as well as violence. Forceful non-violence seems violent to me. When the great tsunami hit Japan followed by the great radiation, at first most of us including me thought it’s ridiculous to compare with Chernobyl. But now we know that we are in worse situation than Chernobyl. Reality is hard to take.

Also, the other day, someone mentioned to me that Gandhi’s death was violent. I forgot about that. I read Wikipedia, but I still don’t understand it.

I still think it’s better to put effort into mass grass-root movements of no-more-bribe rather than mass hunger strikes.

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Hi Jitu

You are right in that not everyone indulges in name-calling. Yet, few are interested in dignified debate. I do nto agree that only because a country is full of complexities, people should change their positions in an opportunistic manner. If they have grown ideologically apart, then it is understandable.I go back to my old pieces of two decades ago and my views have remained the same on major issues.

I do not mind being called cynical because I have always believed that you need to ask questions, inconvenient ones.

Thanks, I know this was addressed to Keiko, but thought I'd chip in.

~F

 

 

 

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Welcome.

You are most welcome Farzana, in fact I am pleased. I believe that our people have multi standards on various issues due to cultural, religious, geographical or a political reasons, and I am sure that you are not one of them. I have read almost every post by you and let me say that I don't know another writer so clear & honest with original thoughts. Thanks for the comment.

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luxury

Farzana,

Please chip in. Thank you. I feel privileged to talk both of you on this hunger strike issue. I'm glad I joined RR and have this friendship. My dream came true! I'm so excited.

About no choice, yes, choice is luxury. We need to remind ourselves time to time. Thank you.

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Keiko and Jitu

Thank you. Honesty should never be attmepted; it has got to be part of you. I see too many 'frank' commentators who are briefed.

Yes, we do have many cultural ideas within a single culture. It is good sometimes, not so at others.

- - -

And Keiko, regarding that hunger strike, way back in April I wrote against it when the so-called mainstream newspapers were still chewing their nails and wondering. It has become purely a business enterprise. One news channel has boasted that it grabbed 46 per cent of the readership. What did one expect?

I am glad I spoke up and continued to hold that position because it is simplistic otherwise. I have seen too many rallies where the well-fed elite take over.

I knew my piece was picked up, but surprised to see it here now:

http://www.srilankaguardian.org/2011/04/fighting-corruption-pitfalls-of....

~F

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More thinking

Farzana,

Thank you for the link. It's well written. I'm glad you spoke up on this difficult issue. It is making me think more.

I'm also glad to be exposed to Sri Lankan newspaper. I clicked a few articles. The articles I selected were all short, not delving into each issue although the captions were very attractive.