where the writers are
A Labor of Love
The Baby Planner, by Josie Brown (Simon & Schuster)

Authoring a novel is somewhat like having a baby: there is a lot of precolating until it is born.

When, finally, you shove it out into the world, all you can do is pray for the best that others love and care for it as much as you do.

My latest novel, called THE BABY PLANNER, has just gotten a big head start in its short life, and I’m sharing it with my friends here, on  RedRoom.com.

This, my fourth novel, will be published  on April 5, 2011 by Simon & Schuster. As with all my books, it’s always great to get a good review, but this one, from Publishers Weekly (the main magazine of the book industry)  really made my day, so I’m passing forward.

Feel free to read an excerpt of THE BABY PLANNER, and afterward, to enter my contest for a $100 gift card to the bookstore of your choice.

I look forward to meeting some of you, at my events for the book, happening all over the country. Here’s a link to the when and where.

Enjoy,

Josie Brown

 

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY REVIEWThe Baby PlannerJosie Brown. S&S/Gallery, $15 trade paper (352p) ISBN 978-1-4391-9712-7

Brown (Secret Lives of Husbands and Wives) takes baby mania to its illogical, hysterical extreme in this bubbly romp. Thirty-seven-year-old Katie’s biological clock is ticking like a time bomb, and she turns her baby obsession into a wildly successful consultant gig planning nurseries for pregnant women too rich, clueless, bedridden, or busy to do the task themselves. Even grieving widower Seth, who works with Katie’s child-shy husband, Alex, on a demanding new business venture, needs Katie’s services to help him manage his perplexing new role as a single dad. But what begins as yet another vanilla chick lit foray into Bugaboo country turns into something bigger than a satire of status-obsessed Bay Area yummy mummies as Brown takes a dark look at the fears of parenthood and family, with Katie’s heartbreaking longing for a child unveiling a disturbing reality about her marriage and family. Still, the message from the somber realities is one full of hope: love makes a family, commitment keeps it together. (Apr.)