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How Sweet It Isn't

I should be shouting from the rooftops, and especially telling my two little girls, age nine and twelve, how exciting it is to be alive in an era in which a woman came just ... that close to being President of the United States and now a woman is actually running for the second highest office in the land.

How sad that I can't.

As Gloria Steinem is only the most recent to say, it's not that it's a woman, it's that it's THIS woman. She admits to being uninformed and "not thinking much" about the war in Iraq -- although her oldest child is headed there. I would have a hard time thinking about anything else. He's only 19. She admits that she hasn't really "formed" a health-care plan with John McCain, although as the mother of five children -- one who will have lifelong disabilities -- it's nearly impossible to believe that this hasn't been on her mind since the moment that the pre-birth test diagnosed Down Syndrome.

 It's especially disheartening in that Sarah Palin is a smart woman. You can hear it in her speech. You can see it in the snap in her step and the sparkle in her eye. Although I think this country needs a Democrat as president as badly as a strong course of antibiotics. it would be great to point to her and say, she's worthy. She's someone to look up to. She really did wonderful things as governor.

I can't tell my daughters any of that. 

They ask me, "Wouldn't it be great if the lady was president?" And I have to say, not this time. Yes, she's as "good" as any of the guys, but she doesn't know what to do to help us be take care of kids and families better and stop the bleeding of our dollars and young lives into what could be a war that spans generations.

I wish I could be proud of Sarah Palin, simply for fighting the good fight. 

Instead, I have to say, maybe one of you.... someday girls.

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Half A Heartbeat Away

Remove the factor that Palin is a woman and her presence on the national stage is a horror.

The views she expresses are not fueled by a basic concern for people. She expresses a philosophy of greed, conveniently blinkered by a nebulous patriotism. Her acceptance of raising one child who is disabled, sending another off to fight a pointless war, and encouraging a third into a teen-age marriage seems primarily a function of making her look 'positive'.

Regardless of the accuracy of the 'stories' floating around her about other aspects of her life, it seems to me her fundamental outlook is greatly flawed.