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Winds of Change
Winds of Change
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Gwyn gives an overview of the book:

After struggling through the throes of being kidnapped by Indians and traded for goods to the Arapahos, Sarah Anderson proves herself worthy of the Indian name Vision Seeker, becomes the wife to Running Swift and the mother to Little Feather.   Sarah settles into the comfortable daily routines of Indian wife and mother until her life is again changed when her husband is killed on a wagon raid.   The Army charges into the village to arrest the warring warriors only to find Sarah living among the natives.   Rescued and returned to Fort Laramie, Sarah must now face the difficult task of transitioning back into the white world with an Indian child, a soiled dove and shunned by the white populace.  At the fort, her path crosses that of Patrick O’Brien whom she once loved.  Confused and frightened, her spirit is lifted when she remembers that in her parfleche is the grass...
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After struggling through the throes of being kidnapped by Indians and traded for goods to the Arapahos, Sarah Anderson proves herself worthy of the Indian name Vision Seeker, becomes the wife to Running Swift and the mother to Little Feather. 

 Sarah settles into the comfortable daily routines of Indian wife and mother until her life is again changed when her husband is killed on a wagon raid.   The Army charges into the village to arrest the warring warriors only to find Sarah living among the natives.   Rescued and returned to Fort Laramie, Sarah must now face the difficult task of transitioning back into the white world with an Indian child, a soiled dove and shunned by the white populace.  At the fort, her path crosses that of Patrick O’Brien whom she once loved.  Confused and frightened, her spirit is lifted when she remembers that in her parfleche is the grass cross Patrick gave her several years ago and his promise to find her

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The thunderous hoof beats of the horses reverberated through the village.  Men scrambled from their lodges, many of them still naked.  They ran and waved their arms to divert the spooked horses.  Running Swift and Hands So High dashed through the village.

Some of the women with small children ran for cover of the woods while others stood ready for an attack as the enemy rode  past, raising their clubs in the air.  Young boys ran among the enemy, firing arrows from their small bows.  Many of the villagers scrambled between teepees to seek safety from tomahawks and pounding hooves, all the while swinging knives and clubs to defend themselves.

The Blackfeet galloped into the center of the campsite, shooting arrows wildly into the crowd of attacking Arapahos.  One warrior slashed a teepee pole, causing the covering to collapse and catch fire from the pit inside. 

“Stop the horses,” shouted Running Swift.  Quickly, he ducked a wild thrust by an attacker, which barely scratched his shoulder.  He nocked his arrow and took aim.  The feathered shaft pierced the rider’s chest.  The brave died on his way to the ground.  Running Swift grabbed a handful of mane and swung into the empty pad saddle.

As he rode into the melee, he yelled, “Push them to the lake.”

Deer Hunter ran toward the water, trying to keep the raiders in front of him.  With his quiver empty, he threw his spear at one of the Blackfeet, missing by two feet.  His arrows would have found their mark.

 

Hearing the thunderous hooves pound the campsite ground, Vision Seeker darted from the path of the panicked animals.  She held her son, Little Feather, in one arm and waved the other, trying to divert the frantic horses. 

A woman in front of her stood terror stricken by the battle raging around her.  

“Move,” Vision yelled, as she dodged a Blackfoot’s tomahawk.  She grabbed the woman by the shoulder and pulled her between two teepees.  A young boy bumped into Vision, knocking her off her feet as he sprinted after the enemy with his bow and arrows. 

Clutching Little Feather to her chest, Vision raced toward the shelter of several trees to hide her son.  She hung his baby bag safely from a branch.

From the tree line, Vision saw Many Faces pick up her small daughter, Little Fawn.  She yelled, “Many Faces, behind you.”

The woman swung a club at a brave on horseback.  An arrow struck her in the stomach.  As she crumpled to the ground, she dropped her daughter. 

Overcome with anger, Vision screamed, “Kill them.  Kill them. Kill the Blackfeet.” 

 

 

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Note from the author coming soon...

About Gwyn

  A native of Jennings, Missouri, Gwyn Ramsey spent many hours at the library reading. In high school she tried her hand at writing.   She took journalism and wrote for the school paper.  After graduation, she went out into the work world and eventually married and raised a...

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