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The Scientific Worldview
The Scientific Worldview: Beyond Newton and Einstein
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Glenn gives an overview of the book:

The Scientific Worldview presents a balanced theoretical perspective that has profound implications for the social and physical sciences. Author Glenn Borchardt outlines the philosophical alternatives and those necessary for consistent scientific thinking. The balanced outlook requires beginning assumptions alien to classical mechanism and modern systems philosophy. The central concept of the resulting philosophical system is univironmental determinism-a new universal mechanism of evolution founded on the simple proposition that whatever happens to a thing is a result of the infinite variety of matter in motion within and without. Borchardt argues that the biased outlook of the twentieth century "scientific worldview," systems philosophy, which overemphasizes systems and neglects environments, taints our most fundamental theories about the universe. But...
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The Scientific Worldview presents a balanced theoretical perspective that has profound implications for the social and physical sciences. Author Glenn Borchardt outlines the philosophical alternatives and those necessary for consistent scientific thinking.

The balanced outlook requires beginning assumptions alien to classical mechanism and modern systems philosophy. The central concept of the resulting philosophical system is univironmental determinism-a new universal mechanism of evolution founded on the simple proposition that whatever happens to a thing is a result of the infinite variety of matter in motion within and without.

Borchardt argues that the biased outlook of the twentieth century "scientific worldview," systems philosophy, which overemphasizes systems and neglects environments, taints our most fundamental theories about the universe. But with the philosophy of univironmental determinism, we can gain the feeling of control in our lives and achieve a newfound level of consciousness through which we will change the world for the betterment of all.

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We are all scientists. Life presents us with one problem after another. Each day, we concern ourselves with cause and effect. Each day, we speculate about the reasons for the actions that surround us. We believe that certain actions produce certain effects. Whenever we depend on finding a relationship between cause and effect, we demonstrate belief in causality. To the extent that we believe that causes must be real, material aspects of the world, we profess the philosophy of determinism.

But there is an opposed philosophy, indeterminism, the belief that some effects may not have material causes. We are born indeterminists, knowing little of the causes of effects. It is only by interacting with the real world that we become determinists, in essence, applying the scientific method to all aspects of existence. As we grow, we discard ignorance based on superstition for knowledge based on experience. The process necessarily involves a perpetual conflict between these two ways of viewing the world; each person and each society professes a philosophy containing elements of both.

Once again, the time has come to examine determinism and indeterminism in a systematic way and to choose wisely between them. The compromises with indeterminism that scientists have concocted since the nineteenth century are getting stale-they are becoming an impediment to progress. Cosmologists have become cosmogonists, naively assuming and unabashedly promulgating the ancient idea that the universe itself had an origin, even though the creation of something from nothing is a religious assumption, not a scientific one. Physicists say that gravitation is due to the "curvature" of "spacetime," but we have trouble imagining how either of these could be. Chemists claim that the universe is becoming more disordered each day, implying that it will eventually end in chaos. Most of our citizens are still enamored with occult

beliefs ranging from the psychic to the astrological. From a strictly scientific perspective, our efforts to appease the religionists have borne strange fruit indeed.

To put science and philosophy back on track, I propose a reopening of the debate between science and religion, which I present here as the struggle between determinism and indeterminism. To be gained from this new rift is a better understanding of the necessarily elusive foundations upon which we build our thought and interpret the external world. To be gained is an improved, internally consistent, and scientific way of viewing the world. Any step in this direction would help us control the technology our culture has spawned.

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About Glenn

I have over 50 years of theoretical, experimental, and observational experience as a scientist especially interested in scientific philosophy. Although I have produced over 320 scientific reports, including journal articles, chapters, books, and computer programs, the best by...

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