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Lovers & Fugitives
Lovers and Fugitives
$20.95
Paperback
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BOOK DETAILS

  • Paperback
  • May.02.2011
  • 9781450267809

Gabriella gives an overview of the book:

Lovers and Fugitives is a spellbinding tale of suspense set amidst the horrors of the Holocaust, an inspiring tribute to the human spirit in the face of overwhelming adverstity, and a tender story of real people, locked in a common stuggle, who redefine the word love. In this, Gabriella Mautner's superb second novel, she recounts the triumphs and the defeats of a German Jewish family in flight from the terrors of the Nazi camps. (Originally published by Mercury House in 1985)
Read full overview »

Lovers and Fugitives is a spellbinding tale of suspense set amidst the horrors of the Holocaust, an inspiring tribute to the human spirit in the face of overwhelming adverstity, and a tender story of real people, locked in a common stuggle, who redefine the word love. In this, Gabriella Mautner's superb second novel, she recounts the triumphs and the defeats of a German Jewish family in flight from the terrors of the Nazi camps.

(Originally published by Mercury House in 1985)

Read an excerpt »

"Paul," Mother said again, sitting down on the edge of the bed. I remained on the threshold, waiting. He did not respond. He reminded me of a mummy. I looked at him from a distant future where all signs of life-man, furniture, utensils-had ossified or fallen to dust. The soiled crumpled sheet created a small distance between Mother and Paul, stressing their separateness: a gap caused by fate, temperament, choice or inertia. I could see how Mother saw him fade from her view, a man on top of a cliff, impossible to keep from falling. The frailty of human existence grew tangible to me along with the skeleton I envisioned through blanket and living flesh in the posture of this man facing the mourning wall of his own mortality. In war and peace, any "delay until further notice" was nothing but a reprieve, each creature living on borrowed time.

I then remembered Mother's reaction to the news of Daddy's death. In the same stance the closed eyes had glimpsed the same horror. For an instant only. Then the veil was mercifully raised, the creature's instinct for survival bolstered by daily cares and the optimism that insures the continuity of the race. Mother had no strength to pass on her optimism now, no desire for empty words. Explanations had reached the point of no return. She sat silent, waiting.  "Don't you see what I am," Paul said at last, to the wall. "You spoke of dragging a mother along. What about dragging a drag?" But his hand now reached back for her to rest on her knee, as if in gratitude for her endurance.

 

 

"So it was never a question of hiding or fleeing.""I don't even have a hideout. The place in Bussum-an emptypromise.""And you knew this all along and gave me that spiel?"He was slow in answering. "May as well stay here and die inpeace."''I'm not impressed," she said."You have no business coming here. Taking all these chances.""I even asked Saskia along.""Hi, Saskia. Don't just stand there. Come in." His face was stillturned to the wall. I went to sit at the foot of his bed."Chances! D'you think that lying here waiting to die isn't taking achance?" Mother scolded. "It won't be in peace, I assure you. If onlyyou'd look beyond that nose of yours-you needn't be a drag.""I look far beyond it. I see too much.""See less, care more."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gabriella-mautner's picture

Note from the author coming soon...

About Gabriella

Gabriella Mautner was born and raised in Chemnitz, East Germany. At the onset of the Nazi regime her family left for Turin, Italy. Shortly before WWII she moved with her parents to Holland. In the midst of the war, barely escaping a call to leave for concentration camp, the...

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