where the writers are
Front Cover.jpeg.jpeg
"Dos Gringos"
Not available.

Frederick gives an overview of the book:

During the Mexican Revolution, a penniless Norwegian and a drifting Irishman meet in an El Paso bar and are hired by a Pittsburgh con-man to fix a gold mine in Mexico with parts which, they discover too late, purposely don't fit. The Norwegian is focused on fixing the mine and needs the money to propose to his girl in El Paso. The Irishman is focused on the local women, is fresh from Ireland's bloody Easter Uprising, and needs to redeem a painful guilt and find a new life. They both are at gunpoint to perform or not perform. Their mutual distrust fades in the face of guns from the warring sides and they must work together to survive and escape back to Texas. Complicating their mission is a mysterious black-suited man selling guns to both sides in the Mexican war, part of Germany's intrigue to keep America out of World War I-and a German and Brit are there to spy on...
Read full overview »

During the Mexican Revolution, a penniless Norwegian and a drifting Irishman meet in an El Paso bar and are hired by a Pittsburgh con-man to fix a gold mine in Mexico with parts which, they discover too late, purposely don't fit.

The Norwegian is focused on fixing the mine and needs the money to propose to his girl in El Paso. The Irishman is focused on the local women, is fresh from Ireland's bloody Easter Uprising, and needs to redeem a painful guilt and find a new life. They both are at gunpoint to perform or not perform. Their mutual distrust fades in the face of guns from the warring sides and they must work together to survive and escape back to Texas. Complicating their mission is a mysterious black-suited man selling guns to both sides in the Mexican war, part of Germany's intrigue to keep America out of World War I-and a German and Brit are there to spy on each other. Texas is far away.

Based on a true story.

Read an excerpt »

The bar doors banged open against the wall. Silhouetted in the afternoon sun was a man in a long coat, a derby on his head. The storm was over. He blinked as he bent and searched into the dark café. He took three steps, leaving the doors open. A boy ran to close them.

“Good afternoon, gentlemen,” the silhouette announced.

The two foreigners, who had just shaken hands for the first time, looked at each other. No one responded.The tan-faced Norwegian, Arthur Johannesen, was on the first stool with his second beer. In his sweat-stained khakis and brown boots this stop was only to catch his breath between the train station and the park where he planned to meet Pauline. Three stools to his left, sitting in front of the framed Budweiser poster of Custer’s Last Stand was the Irishman, Michael Flaherty, a red-haired man in plaid pants and red suspenders, twirling a whiskey with his fingers.

frederick-r-andresen's picture

Some years ago, over beans and tacos in a Phoenix restaurant, my septuagenarian father told me this story of his escapades in the Mexican Revolution. I was born and raised in El Paso and close to my dad, but I had never heard this story before and wondered what else he never told me. I had him repeat the tale several times and recorded it. Of course, details changed as his memory or imagination caught fire. In the story, some names have been created to fit the characters who are all real, including the mysterious man selling guns to both sides, my grandfather for whom I am named (re: the Zimmerman telegram.)

About Frederick

Published writer/traveler/businessman: Author of Walking on Ice, An American Businessman in ...

Read full bio »