where the writers are

Hey, bitch! Get over here, if you know what's good for you!

Hey, bitch! Get over here, if you know what's good for you!

Bad is good as a mating strategy NewScientist, 21 June 2008 by Mason Inman http://web.nmsu.edu/~pjonason/dtstmnewscientist.pdf http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Story?id=5197531&page=2 

NICE guys knew it, now two studies have confirmed it: bad boys get the  most girls. The finding may help explain why a nasty suite of antisocial  personality traits known as the "dark triad" persists in the human  population, despite their potentially grave cultural costs.  The traits are the self-obsession of narcissism; the impulsive,  thrill-seeking and callous behaviour of psychopaths; and the deceitful  and exploitative nature of Machiavellianism. At their extreme, these  traits would be highly detrimental for life in traditional human  societies. People with these personalities risk being shunned by others  and shut out of relationships, leaving them without a mate, hungry and  vulnerable to predators.  But being just slightly evil could have an upside: a prolific sex life,  says Peter Jonason at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. "We  have some evidence that the three traits are really the same thing and  may represent a successful evolutionary strategy."  Jonason and his colleagues subjected 200 college students to personality  tests designed to rank them for each of the dark triad traits. They also  asked about their attitudes to sexual relationships and about their sex  lives, including how many partners they'd had and whether they were  seeking brief affairs.  The study found that those who scored higher on the dark triad personality traits tended to have more partners and more desire for short-term relationships, Jonason reported at the Human Behavior and Evolution Society meeting in Kyoto, Japan, earlier this month. But the correlation only held in males.  James Bond epitomises this set of traits, Jonason says. "He's clearly  disagreeable, very extraverted and likes trying new things - killing  people, new women." Just as Bond seduces woman after woman, people with  dark triad traits may be more successful with a quantity-style or  shotgun approach to reproduction, even if they don't stick around for  parenting. "The strategy seems to have worked. We still have these  traits." Jonason says.  This observation seems to hold across cultures. David Schmitt of Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois, presented preliminary results at the same meeting from a survey of more than 35,000 people in 57 countries. He found a similar link between the dark triad and reproductive success in men. "It is universal across cultures for high dark triad scorers to be more active in short-term mating,"  Schmitt says. "They are more likely to try and poach other people's partners for a brief affair."  Barbara Oakley of Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan, says that  the studies "verify something a lot of people have conjectured about."  Christopher von Rueden of the University of California at Santa Barbara  says that the studies are important because they confirm that  personality variation has direct fitness consequences.  "They still have to explain why it hasn't spread to everyone," says  Matthew Keller of the University of Colorado in Boulder. "There must be  some cost of the traits." One possibility, both Keller and Jonason  suggest, is that the strategy is most successful when dark triad  personalities are rare. Otherwise, others would become more wary and  guarded.