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A Year of Questions: How to slow down and fall in love with life
$22.58
Paperback
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BOOK DETAILS

  • Paperback
  • Aug.30.2007
  • 9781847999733
  • Lulu

Fiona gives an overview of the book:

Watching too much trashy television, trying to find something decent to eat in a motorway service station, feeling awkward at dinner parties, putting off the hoovering... is this what life is all about? These everyday ordinary things happen to us all. This book helps us to discover what we can learn from them. It encourages us to wonder why we hate our boss, and why we keep spending too much money. It invites us to look at the ball of string between our ears and start to untangle it. It nudges us into slowing down, paying more attention, waking up. As well as the hoovering, life is also about seeing a vase of yellow tulips lit up from behind, making creamy potatoes au gratin for your family, sitting by the sea and watching the waves twinkle. `A Year of Questions' will help you to fall in love with your life all over again.
Read full overview »

Watching too much trashy television, trying to find something decent to eat in a motorway service station, feeling awkward at dinner parties, putting off the hoovering... is this what life is all about?

These everyday ordinary things happen to us all. This book helps us to discover what we can learn from them. It encourages us to wonder why we hate our boss, and why we keep spending too much money. It invites us to look at the ball of string between our ears and start to untangle it. It nudges us into slowing down, paying more attention, waking up.

As well as the hoovering, life is also about seeing a vase of yellow tulips lit up from behind, making creamy potatoes au gratin for your family, sitting by the sea and watching the waves twinkle. `A Year of Questions' will help you to fall in love with your life all over again.

Read an excerpt »

This week, work has been very stressful.  Today I made soup. 

I gathered the vegetables together in the kitchen – ordinary vegetables - carrots, potatoes, onions, leeks.  I rubbed dark crumbly earth from the potatoes with my fingers.  I fried the onions, letting clouds of their caramel aroma into the room.  I sliced the squeaky leeks.  I noticed the brilliant orange of the carrots.  I boiled the water and listened to it plobbing and ribupping.

As I moved around the kitchen I felt a kind of release.  I reflected on my work, and untangled some knots.  I made a couple of little decisions that will make a big difference.  I said some kind words to myself.   

I often return to this creative space, whether I'm making soup or cards or novels.  It gives me an opportunity to become absorbed in an attempt at beauty.  It gives me a chance to step out of being 'someone in relation to someone else' - a partner, a daughter, a therapist.  I get to be me, pure and simple.

Things you might be curious about

How often do you give yourself the space to keep track of yourself?  How committed are you to making this space?  What gets in the way? 

Suggestions for this week

Make a date with yourself this week to find out about a new creative pursuit or revisit an old one.  Find an evening class in welding, buy a new sketch-pad, make a collage of the inside of a space-ship with your children, collect leaves in the park, get a Greek recipe book out of the library. 

We all need to have a creative outlet - a window, a space - so we don't lose track of ourselves.  Norman Fischer

When we let ourselves respond to poetry, to music, to pictures, we are clearing a space where new stories can root, in effect we are clearing a space for new stories about ourselves.  Jeanette Winterson

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Note from the author coming soon...

About Fiona

Fiona Robyn is on a mission to help people connect with the world through writing. You can hear more about how to pay more attention (and read Lorrie's story) in her free e-book, 'How to Write Your Way Home'. She runs...

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