where the writers are
Surfing Through A Manuscript

Sandy has come and gone, and while she visited Vero Beach she rearranged sand and assisted in a few home renovations.  Today's prize as we walked on the beach was an intact set of steps. To where? Who knows? We were more or less hoping for some pieces of eight from one of the Spanish galleons that sank off this coast in 1715, but you can't have everything.

Sandy's real gift to the Treasure Coast, was the towering waves. On Friday night we ventured out to see what damage had been wrought and found about thirty surfers riding them, or at least trying to. The beach was crowded with onlookers, and we quickly learned why. One of the surfers was Kelly Slater, 11 times world champion, and both the youngest and oldest holder of that title. How often do you encounter a champion on a random walk?

I've never paid much attention to surfing.Although I grew up on Florida's Gulf Coast, our waves were tame. I've visited Hawaii's North Shore, home of the famous Pipeline, but never in the winter when surfers worldwide come to ride the waves. So this was my first real surfing demo, and what a great one. I was reminded as I watched of some of the similarities to writing.

  • The first time you wade into the water or the manuscript, a safe outcome seems impossible.
  • Practice is the difference between sinking and gliding happily to your destination.
  • Once you've learned the basics you must be willing to take chances to get to the next level.
  • It's best to surf (and write) with friends to support you and catch you if you need help
  • Sharks aren't always visible, so you should be ever vigilant.
  • You don't have to be a pro or a champion to love the experience.

Have you ever wanted to write a novel or even your memoirs? Have you ever wanted to hop on a surfboard? Now's the time to climb aboard. What's stopping you?