where the writers are
Mantel, Middleton and Moi

Threshold Girl by me on Kindle about 1910 Canada

I bought Hillary Mantel's A Place of Greater Safety to read on my Kindle...

I'm enjoying it, a great history lesson. Her style is not elegant, rather choppy, but oddly effective and perhaps good for the subject matter ( choppy times, literally and figuratively).

I seem to remember that Paris in the Terror  (Loomis) was one of my favorite reads as a teenager. I seem to remember the style of this book was amazing. But it has been years.

In college, I recall taking a scene from the book to use as an example in my Sociology course about Mobs. It's a scene where someone while alive gets his heard ripped out - and then someone in the crowd eats it. Yummy!

Amazingly, I have found two typos in the Kindle text already, published by UK General Books, and I am but 15 percent through. I worry so much about typos in Threshold Girl, my Kindle book about three Canadian girls in 1910.

But if a Kindle novel by a renowned author ( a double Man Booker Prize winner!) can have typos, well, why not my book, which I wrote and edited by myself?

As I just said, it's been a long time since I read about the French Revolution so I am not up on my characters.

Mantel's book has a long, long long list of characters at the beginning, but with Kindle you  can't really flip back.

And there's no cover either. Pity.

I have a cover, at least, for Threshold Girl. Even if it is an amateurish cover, with a lovely picture of Marion Nicholson in her white dress taking tea outside her family home, Tighsolas, in Richmond Quebec in 1910.

I must admit, I chose Hillary Mantel because I read about her controversial speech a short while ago where she deconstructed Kate Middleton - like a good historian - and got some bad press for it.

I'm also reading Mantel's novel because I have been having writer's block lately (what with Quebec's dismal snowy March) and the only way I can shake off writer's block is by reading GOOD STUFF. A lot of it.

It's like feeding the plants.