where the writers are
Dreams, Madmen and Paper Towels


 

My Buddha holding a little dream catcher. 

 

Last night I had one of those dreams that you don't want to wake up from. Sean Connery played a big part in it. But it wasn't one of THOSE dreams. No.  It was a weird, long and complicated dream.

 

And I only awoke from it because my real life dogs started barking at something outside.

 

Dreams are weird, but some dreams you know are trying to tell you something. Sometimes it is just too obvious.

 

In this dream Sean Connery was the person trying to tell me something. He was a teacher in a classroom and he began his lecture with a Shakespeare style line. He repeated it again and again, but because there was noise coming from other places, I couldn't hear it.

 

And then he got close and I explained that I didn't hear the line, "despite all"  meaning, despite the fact you have this powerful stage voice. "There's too much background noise."

 

And then the dogs woke me up.

 

The rest of the dream, like most dreams, had weird iconography. I was at a beach and a procession was emerging from the mud and water at the shore, slowly, a procession of what? I remember a  llama and horses and chariots. It was sort of like characters in a Roman frieze. (So an archeology motif.)

 

 

 

And before, when I was going to class, the room happened to be where I lived, so no issues here of finding the classroom, a typical anxiety dream, but I did forget my textbook, or drop it, so there was an element of  anxiety, although I had a scribbler for notes.

 

And I was doing my laundry all the while.. "Might as well, " I say to someone, "as I live in this classroom." See, silly dream, that I know means something to me. "Dirty laundry?" Hmm.

 

Anyway, this morning I got up and turned on the TV to the Olympics and it was only after the second US Election ad that I realized I was on NBC. They were covering the marathon, so I quickly turned to the Canadian channel.

 

There are lots of adverts featuring children during these Olympics. I like the Old Navy one. "She's not new." The little red headed girl is adorable.

 

I've already mentioned the Bounty ad, that shows kids imitating their athletic heroes in the home, jumping on a bed, doing a cartwheel in the hall -with the scroll disclaimer. "Kids, don't do this at home."

 

This is especially ironic for Canadians today, as Canada got its first gold medal in the trampoline. (I don't agree with observers who think the Chinese champion blew it. Had  Rosie MacLennan not laid down a fantastic routine, the Chinese girl probably wouldn't have fallen at the end. That's what I think.

 

Anyway, of all the Olympic disciplines, trampoline is one of the most dangerous. I recall we had a trampoline at our high school in the 60's, but I bet they don't have them now.

 

About 20 years ago, we would visit a relative's cottage and their neighbour had a trampoline and my sons loved playing on it, but I worried the whole time as it was just plunked in the yard. No netting. My sons' only injury was when they bumped heads hard.

 

 

"Kids, don't do this at home," is not an attitude that will breed future champion trampoline artists.

 

So many Olympic events, today, have a dangerous acrobatic element. And yet we live in a day and age where moms don't let their sons climb the oak in the back yard if they can help it.

 

I finally got around to watching Madmen. In one of the first episodes, some kids are playing in a house and the girl walks into the kitchen with a dry cleaning bag over her head. The mom is appalled: "Young lady, march right back upstairs and put my clean clothes back in that bag," she says, not worrying a bit about her daughter suffocating. Ah, the sixties.

 

Anyway, the Ethiopian is about to win the Marathon. The Canadian announcer keeps saying BUCKEEEENNNNGGG HAMMMM palace. My English aunt always thought it amusing the way Canadians pronounce the HAM so clearly..    when it's really Buckinhmmmm Palace..

 

Oh, and now they are playing that Macdonald's ad, where they show that there's a MacDonald's just about everywhere in the world. I know this. I've been visiting Unesco Heritage Sites online. You see Starbucks and Macdonalds everywhere.  Lijiang, the cute historical town in China, at the foot of the Himalayas, has a KFC.

 

They gave us Buddha, we gave them Big Macs. Ohmm. Hold the Cheese.

 

 

 

Well, I noticed you can't get a hamburger  or other American style junk food at the Redondo Beach Pier, just sea-food, so there's poetic justice, I guess.

 

 Storks on Redondo Beach Pier