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Paradise Road
Amazon.com Amazon.com
Powell's Books Powell's Books

David Scott gives an overview of the book:

A man out to beat Las Vegas at its own game-- putting his money, his woman, his life on the line-- "The drive to win at blackjack is the lifeblood that keeps this novel alive and kicking until the last apocalyptic hand." "It was my misfortune to have missed The Quarterback, and thus be unaware of this fine, unflinching writer. He does not prettify, embroider, ornament or otherwise offend against the utter dignity of his hard, enduring characters; out of their meanness and misery, he has made a story which I envy, in prose as clean and businesslike as a switchblade. Make sure everyone hears about this book; it's not about a gambler and a broad and a fighter at all-- it's about the human condition, and it's beautiful." -- George V. Higgins, author of The Friends of Eddie Coyle
Read full overview »

A man out to beat Las Vegas at its own game-- putting his money, his woman, his life on the line-- "The drive to win at blackjack is the lifeblood that keeps this novel alive and kicking until the last apocalyptic hand."

"It was my misfortune to have missed The Quarterback, and thus be unaware of this fine, unflinching writer. He does not prettify, embroider, ornament or otherwise offend against the utter dignity of his hard, enduring characters; out of their meanness and misery, he has made a story which I envy, in prose as clean and businesslike as a switchblade. Make sure everyone hears about this book; it's not about a gambler and a broad and a fighter at all-- it's about the human condition, and it's beautiful." -- George V. Higgins, author of The Friends of Eddie Coyle

Read an excerpt »

Preface to the new edition of Paradise Road

In 1969, while traveling through Reno, Nevada, I picked up a copy of Edward O. Thorp’sBeat the Dealer.” Thorp, working with computers, had devised a strategy for overcoming the house’s advantage in the game of blackjack. Unlike most casino games, blackjack, because of constant shifting odds, offers the player the chance to get an edge. Simply put, the richer the deck is in tens, picture cards, and aces, the greater the player’s chance of wining. Counting cards, and making rapid calculations, it was possible for a committed player to take advantage of these shifts and, indeed, beat the dealer.

Thorpe’s book opened a flood-gate. Hordes of professional card counters inundated the casinos of Nevada. Fortunately for the casinos, it was easier to fantasize beating the dealer than accomplishing it.

It was a grueling process involving boundless hours of practice, not only in keeping a running count of the cards, but in making accurate split-second calculations to go along with the shifting card count.

I became one of these card counters. Backed by the proceeds from my first novel, “The Quarterback,” and my film, “Born to Win,” I set out for Vegas to ply Thorp’s system. Taking a room in The Hacienda Hotel at the far end of the strip, not one of Vegas’ more elegant spots, I went to work.

(for complete preface see www.dsmwriter.com)

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Note from the author coming soon...

About David Scott

David Scott Milton is an American novelist, playwright, and screenwriter. His plays are known for their theatricality, wild humor, and poetic realism, while his novels and films are darker and more naturalistic. As a novelist, he has been compared to Graham Greene, John...

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Published Reviews

Feb.11.2010

"As the dark comedy 'Duet for Solo Voice' begins, Leonard Pelican, its only character, recounts his personal chronology: published a novel at 24, married a chorus girl at 26, entered a mental institution...

Feb.11.2010

"DUET FOR SOLO VOICE by David Scott Milton gives us a splash of Absurdist Theatre from 1970 in which a schizophrenic night manager of a hotel deals with imaginary dangers while the hotel residents, moan,...