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To Be Famous And A Best Seller - Write Like This!

OK - I was prepared to dislike (and disagree) with this article. I thought of 'writer who sells soul for a writer who sells his soul', since it is by an author who "helps" James Patterson write some of his many books.

Yes, I did gag on this particular sentence: "We are in the business of entertainment, not edification or enlightenment.”  Well -  no, think I. I most certainly write for more than entertainment. I do, however, make all my stories entertaining.

But, when all is said and done, if you follow (sometimes judiciously) the advice in this article, you will create a novel which better suits your characters and your readers.

Best seller stamp — Stock Vector #5351332

Stock Vector — Best seller stamp

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What I Learned from James Patterson

A coauthor shares some advice he gleaned from working with the global bestseller

 By Mark Sullivan

I’ve been lucky enough to write with James Patterson for the past two and a half years. Before that I’d written eight novels, including Rogue, been published in multiple languages, sold books into movies, and been nominated for and won various awards. In short, I thought I knew what I was doing when it came to commercial fiction. Working with Patterson, however, I discovered quickly that I didn’t.

I’d always worked organically, starting a tale to see where it took me and then figuring out an outline if the story showed promise. My coauthor forced me to think logically and deeply through every scene up front, long before we even thought about writing.

During the eight weeks it took us to craft the outline of Private Berlin, for example, Patterson was constantly pushing the envelope, from the premise to the characters, from the action to the setting.

(more)

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/columns-and-blogs/soapbox/article/55152-what-i-learned-from-james-patterson.html

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http://depositphotos.com/5351332/stock-illustration-Best-seller-stamp.html

 

Comments
3 Comment count
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What would Kafka say?

Would he then write a novel about someone who wore a hardhat?  

Would he give K. a haunted past?  

 

Anyway....thanks for this! And all the Scribes thank you!

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Haunted

Thaisa - Kafka gave all his Ks a haunted past. And - of course - a haunted present.

Hardhats optional (and a cute observation).

Scribes United - something about changing the world.

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K's past

Yes! He did. But he almost never went into detail.