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Getting Drunk In London Like Real Authors Do

What better way to end one year (or begin a New Year) than ... drinking?

Of course authors drink. It calms them down after telling all those stories. Or it gets them in the mood to tell all those stories. Or it helps oil the passageway whilst telling all those stories. As you see, it is the telling of the stories which is the catalyst. Authors - of course - are true innocents. But the characters they have to deal with - Oy!

So...

Pull a draft.

Pour a pint. 

A shooter, if you please.

"Shaken, not stirred, my good man."

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Literary Pubs of London: A Beer-Soaked History

 by Jessica Furseth  

The 2000-year-old city that is London is a living, breathing history book. While Samuel Johnson was right: “There is in London all that life can afford,” often what we locals like doing most is to haul up in the pub. Luckily, we need not choose between comfort and culture when looking for a watering hole around London town, because so many pubs are rich in historical and literary connotations. So get your pint and find a seat by the fire, underneath low beams on crooked floors, and get merry in the knowledge Dickens may well have sat in the very same spot.

Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese, 145 Fleet Street, in the cityYe Olde Cheshire Cheese

Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese. Photo credit: Simon James via Flickr.

One of many London pubs with a Charles Dickens connection, it’s easy to see the author penning some of his gloomier stories at Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese. The atmosphere comes from the lack of windows, but take this as is part of the charm as you crawl through the many little rooms inside. There’s been a pub in this spot since 1538, but the one there today was re-built after the Great Fire of London. Dickens’ novel A Tale of Two Cities makes a reference to this pub, when the characters make their way along Fleet Street “up a covered way, into a tavern … where Charles Darnay was soon recruiting his strength with a good plain dinner and good wine.

(more)

http://tra.velne.ws/view/literary-pubs-of-london-a-beer-soaked-history

Comments
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What a fun and fabulous post!

What a fun and fabulous post!  I love England and I love the idea (yes I am a romantic at heart!) of a writer toasting a hearty pint and the stories flowing effortlessly forth!  :)  Brilliant!  Happy New Year!

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Glad you enjoy the whimsy.

Glad you enjoy the whimsy. There is always a reason to hoist a hearty pint. Which I trust you do for the New Year.

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AJ put it right ~

Great share, Dale.  Take me to a pub.  I'll set you a pint and we'll tell our stories and hoist a few.  Then we'll go write more, fortified by one another's company.  

Happy New Year!  Cheers

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Or we'll write more fortified

Or we'll write more fortified by fortified wine.

Cheers, indeed! Happy New Year, Michael.