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Big Black Wet

This morning glowered with heavy clouds that looked more beast than atmosphere.  It had rained all night, and I kept the window cracked to hear the dripping and pattering wet out there, a pretty sound that belied the rumbling, shifting masses overhead. Sometimes clouds like those seem to be more like movie set props that need to be shoved around and into position by harried stage hands than they do actual clouds.  All that the whole sky needed was a director with a megaphone, "Let's pull that monster over Monterey and darken everything.  Heavy on the rain now.  Action!"    

 

In Pacific Grove, I was right underneath them and didn't really get the full measure of their heft until I drove north around the bay to its far eastern edge near Sand City.  Once I got out of the car and looked south, the dramatic layered aspect of the clouds arrayed all along the southern horizon was impossible to ignore.  

The cumulus crowded around the hills and stood up on their hind legs pawing at the air, spoiling for a fight.  Some had white edges and a puffy quality for a few moments that was positively pretty. Not for long though.  Constantly changing and tumbling, the cloud density increased and then lowered, impenetrably opaque, and soon rain was falling in the distance.  

When clouds are heavy and stern, commanding attention from stage center as they were today, they act like an iron lid that has clanged down and darkened the water.  The color palette is a study in steel gray, silver, and iron black.  Rain hangs down like curtains, billowing and slanting across the hills and tree tops.  

 

With that much dark water booming at the shore, it's simple to imagine a tsunami looming on the horizon and having to run for your life.  Or to imagine large sea monsters rising up and making awful noises while they lick their chops.  Winter cold and uncompromising forces of water and wind were taking no prisoners, from the look of it all.  

There was no broad daylight as I looked around even then, at high noon.  Big surly rounds of churning moisture could have just sat down on the ground and squashed everything.  

More rain to come in this sodden winter, and certainly a few days of storm surf and billowing clouds too beautiful to ignore.  

Comments
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Too Beautiful

You have captured so much of what I love about the ocean, the cinematic quality, the magnificence and majesty, the colour palette, and the way in which it commands our attention, respect and awe. Thanks for yet another evocative and well crafted piece.

Cheers

 Cindy

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Beautiful

Thank you very much, Cindy.  The ocean is a wrap-around view where I live, and we learn here to never turn our back on it.  As far as I'm concerned, that would be impossible.  Not to say I don't love rivers.  I'm kind of a water rat, but the ocean is the closest and grandest thing.  I know Australians are likely never to turn their backs on the ocean either, so there's our common ground.  Thank you so much for reading and commenting.  I'm hoping to catch up on my friends' - including your - blogs on RedRoom this week now that the holiday season is over at last.  

Cheers,

Christine 

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Cue the inspiration!

Your writing and your writing resolution inspired me. I've decided to write everyday on here as well.

Writers write. I hope the practice and habit will improve my writing and my outlook.

Just keep writing, just keep writing, Amy

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Hi!

Amy, so nice to see you here. I recall you were writing a textbook or new curriculum at the LCWR. True? And you took the time to listen to some awful writing of mine. I'm very thankful for that week and the generosity of everyone there; an unforgettably fine self-indulgence.

I'm excited that you're inspired to write. I'm finally finding a bit of extra time to read other writer's pieces here on RR and look forward to attempting to keep up with you. Very cool.

Cheers,
Christine

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The cat

Christine,

Your writing was not awful. Your writing about the cat really stuck with me.

The LCWR seemed pretty magical to me. A place where we could do and be our hopes. Yep, Bob, Mira, and I are still working together on curriculum. :)

Thank you for your feedback, Amy