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Epithalamion
Epithalamion
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Cheryl gives an overview of the book:

Comstock Review calls Epithalamion "a 64 page collection with an unusual binding. Inside it’s vintage Snell but more surreal, and with more Hindu content and themes. Again, she stuns us with her imagery." This volume includes seven linocuts by the artist Janet Snell.
Read full overview »

Comstock Review calls Epithalamion "a 64 page collection with an unusual binding. Inside it’s vintage Snell but more surreal, and with more Hindu content and themes. Again, she stuns us with her imagery." This volume includes seven linocuts by the artist Janet Snell.

Read an excerpt »

EPITHALAMION

Your voice pooled around my commonsense.

I pulled white silk through my brass ring,

dropping hints at your pigeon-toed feet.

A pulse jumped under my blue-veined skin.

A mosaic of pain broke out like war.

At the rehearsal, Mother in her flatline calm

bombed our drinks with cherries

and posted a curse above the published banns.

We sat there glumly, holding back her hands.

Before this devolves into a narrative of hindsight-

your heart grows numb, the kids burn down the halfway house - 

you should know I've come prepared: keys jammed

between my knuckles, a map of alternatives on the dash.

Right beside the rigid Mary. Right under your lucky dice.

cheryl-l-snell's picture

This book includes two Pushcart Prize nominated pieces.

About Cheryl

My books include poetry and fiction.  My first novel, Shiva's Arms, tells the story of an American woman who marries into a Hindu Brahmin family, and explores the themes of cultural identity and the meaning of family.

When I married into a Hindu Brahmin...

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Published Reviews

Apr.27.2009

Cheryl Snell has collaborated with her sister, Janet Snell to bring forth an astute and staggering blend of poetry, science, and art in her Multiverse collection. Cheryl probes the evolving understanding of...

May.30.2009

"This is a collection of poems to be lingered over, like reminders of first views or experiences we usually keep to ourselves for fear that speaking of them will make them lost to us. Snell has captured...