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Charlie Courtland's Blog

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Feb.25.2010
Moral Lessons Vs. Happy EndingsEveryone is familiar with the modern day Disney version of most fairy tales, but did you ever wonder where they came from?   Most were precautionary tales told to heed warning  to impressionable children. They were meant to be gruesome and frightening, many ending...
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Feb.11.2010
My Quick Guide To Creating A Psychopathic Character!In order to create a believable character, a writer must attempt to understand the psychology and traits that drive the personality and compulsion behind the character.  If you're not a psychopath or know a psychopath how can you write a...
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Feb.03.2010
SINopsis Of EnvyEnvy is Greed's ugly cousin and Jealousy's half sister.  They are related by an insatiable desire, but differ because greed refers to material goods, jealousy is the fear of losing what you already have, and envy is about wanting what you don't have and wanting others to lose what...
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Feb.02.2010
Are Women As Violent As Men: Stereotype or Fact? Recently on the news, it was determined by various organizations that the distribution of emergency relief supplies to earthquake victims in Haiti are being assigned to women since they are by nature, less violent and combative.  It was explained...
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Feb.02.2010
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A hundred miles south of L.A., a school district is meeting to decide whether or not to ban the Merriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.  What?  That was my reaction too.  If a dictionary can get banned from a public school in the United States, then all books are in serious trouble.  Apparently,...
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Feb.02.2010
Recently, I reviewed a story and in my comments I referred to the use of clichés. It got me thinking about what is a cliché and how as an author and book reviewer, I use and address these dratted buggers. Clichés crawl into everyone's work and articles. Even the best selling author Dan Brown...
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