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Dead Man's Cove
Dead Man's Cove
$9.96
Paperback
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BOOK DETAILS

  • Paperback
  • Oct.17.2012
  • 9781480126022

Charles gives an overview of the book:

Al, Sandra, and Quincy are invited to a secluded island for a weekend of fun. When one of their fellow revelers ends up dead, and a storm makes it impossible for the police to come to their aid, Al must find the killer before more people end up dead.
Read full overview »

Al, Sandra, and Quincy are invited to a secluded island for a weekend of fun. When one of their fellow revelers ends up dead, and a storm makes it impossible for the police to come to their aid, Al must find the killer before more people end up dead.

Read an excerpt »

I hate boats.        

I grew up in a small community in East Texas; the largest body of water was a lake about twenty miles from my hometown, and the muddy Sabine River that forms the border between Texas and Louisiana; during the dry season, it’s so shallow you can wade across it.  

When I joined the army right out of high school, I picked that service because my eyes were not good enough to be a flier in the air force, and the navy and marines spent too much damn time on boats, or ships as the recruiter corrected me when I visited the recruiting station in Houston.   Didn’t matter what you called them, boats or ships, they spent too much time on water, and for me, water was for drinking or bathing; swimming as long as you could see the bottom of whatever it was you were swimming in.        

The problem with boats is that whenever they’re on the water, unless they’re as big as an aircraft carrier or an ocean liner, they’re always moving; bobbing up and down, swaying from side to side, pitching and yawing, and all the other nausea-inducing things boats do.   They also have an unfortunate tendency to spring leaks.   The presence of pumps on small boats might be reassuring to some people, but it only reminds me that the damn things aren’t as water tight as all that.        

So, like I said, I hate boats.   But, here I was, on a Friday afternoon, standing on the stern of a boat watching the wake behind us as we cut through the slightly choppy waters of the Chesapeake Bay, the land just a smudge on the horizon behind us and to the left, and nothing to the front or right but water; grey-blue in the afternoon light, with little razor sharp lines of white where waves pitched up and played tag with the air.        

My name is Al Pennyback; the name on my birth certificate, thanks to a mother with aspirations that I never lived up to, is Albert Einstein Pennyback.   The only thing I have in common with that Al is a tendency at times to be a bit eccentric, and a love for puzzles.

 

 

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Note from the author coming soon...

About Charles

A native of East Texas, I have been involved in leading organizations (particularly those in trouble) for over 40 years.  I have written a number of articles on history, culture and leadership, and have written three books on leadership in addition to my fiction works. The Al...

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Published Reviews

Oct.31.2008

kudos to Charlie for his terrific book "Things I Learned from my Grandmother about Leadership and Life ." I gobbled it up and it would be wonderful reading for whatever incarnation of leadership training...

Jun.08.2009

Things I Learned From My Grandmother About Leadership and Life is a small book that makes a great impact. Charles Ray, the author blends his fond memories of his grandmother with his dual career as a...