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Rings of Lispector (Agua Viva) by Helene Cixous and Roni Horn (translation)
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beverley gives an overview of the book:

Roni Horn's work ranges from unapologetically pretty color close-ups of striking young faces (This is Me, This is You) and darkly patterned studies of the surface of the River Thames (Dictionary of Water) to her playful abstractions and wordplay-filled installations inspired by the French feminist theorist and writer, Hal ne Cixous. Rings of Lispector draws in turn from the work of one of Cixous's own favorite authors, the Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector. Horn has covered a floor with interconnecting rubber tiles and passages from Lispector's Agua Viva, arranged in rippled circles. The piece reflects on architectural space and poetic force, encouraging viewers to experience the rubber physically underfoot and to view the words from above. This disorienting act of location, characteristic of Horn's exploration of the possibilities of language as a sculptural form,...
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Roni Horn's work ranges from unapologetically pretty color close-ups of striking young faces (This is Me, This is You) and darkly patterned studies of the surface of the River Thames (Dictionary of Water) to her playful abstractions and wordplay-filled installations inspired by the French feminist theorist and writer, Hal ne Cixous. Rings of Lispector draws in turn from the work of one of Cixous's own favorite authors, the Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector. Horn has covered a floor with interconnecting rubber tiles and passages from Lispector's Agua Viva, arranged in rippled circles. The piece reflects on architectural space and poetic force, encouraging viewers to experience the rubber physically underfoot and to view the words from above. This disorienting act of location, characteristic of Horn's exploration of the possibilities of language as a sculptural form, addresses inner emotions with the idea of landscape. All this is documented in two slipcased volumes, with an essay by Hal ne Cixous.

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Note from the author coming soon...

About beverley

BEVERLEY BIE BRAHIC was born in Canada, and lives in Paris and Stanford, California. A translator and poet, her work has appeared in Field, Literary Imagination, Notre Dame Review, Oxford Poetry, PN Review, Poetry, The Times Literary Supplement, and elsewhere. Her second...

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Published Reviews

Oct.17.2008

“The quality of the translator’s work, the agile and elegant expressions she puts forth, mean that this triad of recent Cixous texts, appearing for the first time in English, is a fine resource for non-...

Oct.17.2008

“The translator, Beverley Bie Brahic, herself a poet, displays here an extraordinary gift for conveying the redistributions and explosions of sense that Cixous practises in this writing/reading that never...