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Congo cookbook

 

Saka-Saka (Cassava Leaves)

 

 

 

Saka-Saka (Saca-Saca, Sakasaka, and also known as Mpondou, Mpondu, or Pondu) is the Congolese word for cassava leaves, and the name of a dish made from them. Could "saka" be a Congolese pronunciation of "cassava", doubled for an emphasis on quantity to name a dish wherein cassava leaves are the main ingredient? 

Central African people seem to be unique in their consumption of cassava leaves, which are cooked as greens. Elsewhere in the world, the cassava (or manioc, yuca, or yucca) plant is cultivated only for its tubers.

Cassava leaves are found only in the tropics. If you can pick your own fresh cassava leaves, select the smaller, newer leaves; the larger, older ones are tough. If cassava leaves are not available, substitute collards, kale, turnip greens, or similar. As a writer,  I always do my best to take my health seriously by eating traditional food. When I have this dish, I feel like I have a desire for more and more. I am a big eater, believe me. 

Ingredients

       Lots of cassava greens stems removed, cleaned, and cut or torn into pieces

A few spoonfuls of palm oil, Moambé Sauce, or any oil

One onion, chopped

One clove garlic, minced

Sweet green pepper and/or sweet red pepper, chopped (optional)

Eggplant (peeled, cubed, rinsed, and salted) or okra, chopped (optional)

Salt, or baking soda, to taste

One piece of dried, salted, or smoked fish; or one can of pilchards; or one can of sardines

 

What you do 

Throughly crush, mash, or grind the greens in a mortar and pestle or with whatever you can improvise. (roll them with a rolling pin, crush them in a heavy bowl with the bottom of a sturdy bottle, etc.) 

Bring a large pot of water to a boil; add greens and cook for thirty minutes or more (much more if using cassava leaves). 

Add all the remaining ingredients to the greens and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer. Do not stir. Simmer until the water is mostly gone and the greens are cooked to a pulp. 

Serve aside with a fried chicken, meat, very hot chili. With rice, fufu or batton de manioc ( cassava tubes)

 

Check this out:

 

http://www.congocookbook.com/vegetable_and_side_dish_recipes/saka_saka.html

 

 http://www.ivu.org/recipes/african/saka.html

 

http://img1.eyefetch.com/p/24/631596-86e36812-4b23-4b16-b3ed-766dd432007fl.jpg

 http://neocassava.blogspot.com/2007/12/saka-saka-cassva-leaves.html

 

 

 

 

 

 Saka-Saka (Cassava Leaves)

 

 

 

Saka-Saka (Saca-Saca, Sakasaka, and also known as Mpondou, Mpondu, or Pondu) is the Congolese word for cassava leaves, and the name of a dish made from them. Could "saka" be a Congolese pronunciation of "cassava", doubled for an emphasis on quantity to name a dish wherein cassava leaves are the main ingredient? 

Central African people seem to be unique in their consumption of cassava leaves, which are cooked as greens. Elsewhere in the world, the cassava (or manioc, yuca, or yucca) plant is cultivated only for its tubers.

Cassava leaves are found only in the tropics. If you can pick your own fresh cassava leaves, select the smaller, newer leaves; the larger, older ones are tough. If cassava leaves are not available, substitute collards, kale, turnip greens, or similar. As a writer,  I always do my best to take my health seriously by eating traditional food. When I have this dish, I feel like I have a desire for more and more. I am a big eater, believe me. 

Ingredients

       Lots of cassava greens stems removed, cleaned, and cut or torn into pieces

A few spoonfuls of palm oil, Moambé Sauce, or any oil

One onion, chopped

One clove garlic, minced

Sweet green pepper and/or sweet red pepper, chopped (optional)

Eggplant (peeled, cubed, rinsed, and salted) or okra, chopped (optional)

Salt, or baking soda, to taste

One piece of dried, salted, or smoked fish; or one can of pilchards; or one can of sardines

What you do 

Throughly crush, mash, or grind the greens in a mortar and pestle or with whatever you can improvise. (roll them with a rolling pin, crush them in a heavy bowl with the bottom of a sturdy bottle, etc.) 

Bring a large pot of water to a boil; add greens and cook for thirty minutes or more (much more if using cassava leaves). 

Add all the remaining ingredients to the greens and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer. Do not stir. Simmer until the water is mostly gone and the greens are cooked to a pulp. 

Serve aside with a fried chicken, meat, very hot chili. With rice, fufu or batton de manioc ( cassava tubes)

 

Check this out:

 

http://www.congocookbook.com/vegetable_and_side_dish_recipes/saka_saka.html

 

 http://www.ivu.org/recipes/african/saka.html

 

http://img1.eyefetch.com/p/24/631596-86e36812-4b23-4b16-b3ed-766dd432007fl.jpg

 http://neocassava.blogspot.com/2007/12/saka-saka-cassva-leaves.html