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Thoughtful Thursday: Old Guard, Ebooks and Catty Comments
bibliomaniac
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As a non-fiction author and journalist, I come from the world of traditional print publishing. I never thought anything could take the place of newspapers and magazines, and I wrote boatloads of articles and columns before I realized a book was the same amount of work but paid better. Duh. After the first six books, I signed with a high-powered agent, and my pet writing dreams took off.

I can hear other writers snickering—“Pet writing? Are you kidding?!” Folks, this was in the days of 6-figure advances, spokesperson tours with major pet food companies, and multi-book deals. I ain’t a-woofin’ you (as they say here in Texas).

So what happened? Internet and Google. Hisssssssssss! Read the rest of my guest blog on the Grand Conversation about Ebooks over at Shane Jiraiya Cummings site.

Meanwhile, Ebooks have affected the brick-and-mortar bookstores in unexpected ways. Borders filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection this week, with debt of $1.29 billion and assets of $1.275 billion. Book publishers and distributors are among the top creditors, with about $230 million owed. They plan to close about 200 stores over the next weeks--that's 30 percent of their locations. 

An article on the subject from Publishers Lunch quotes a release from President Mike Edwards in part, "... Borders Group does not have the capital resources it needs to be a viable competitor and which are essential for it to move forward with its business strategy to reposition itself successfully for the long term."

I feel for the folks affected by the store closings. Borders assures consumers that this won't affect Ebooks they've purchased or future sales. Uh huh. Not holding my breath on that one.

Now that the big New York houses got a major hit in the ass-ets, how d'ya think that will affect writers? Will it give 'em all warm and fuzzy feelings about taking a chance on that bright new writer? Or will they (as a recent FaceBook conversation between a couple of bestselling authors suggested), raise prices of existing product to offset loses? "Retrain the audience..." to pay more for Ebooks and hardcovers, to make ends meet?

Right thoughty of 'em, eh?

Well, here's what my current editor thinks of the whole thing:

Seren "Editing"