where the writers are
Oses fores antexeis (As many times as you can bear it)
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Amanda gives an overview of the book:

The unnamed heroine, an introverted public servant who has just lost her job, shares a brief idyll with Ivo, a Tzech travel agent who resembles Kafka. After meeting him in an athenian pub she pursues him across Europe, communicating in a kind of Euro-creole or extempore Esperanto with the people she meets on the way. Her journey takes her deeper into a world of Kafka echoes and the whole book is permeated with the presence of Kafka -in the form of excerpts from his diary and correspondence, his image in a series of Kafka look-alikes and his putative reincarnation in the form of Grete Samsa.
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The unnamed heroine, an introverted public servant who has just lost her job, shares a brief idyll with Ivo, a Tzech travel agent who resembles Kafka. After meeting him in an athenian pub she pursues him across Europe, communicating in a kind of Euro-creole or extempore Esperanto with the people she meets on the way. Her journey takes her deeper into a world of Kafka echoes and the whole book is permeated with the presence of Kafka -in the form of excerpts from his diary and correspondence, his image in a series of Kafka look-alikes and his putative reincarnation in the form of Grete Samsa.

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Note from the author coming soon...

About Amanda

Amanda Michalopoulou was born in Athens, in 1966, and she has studied French Literature in Athens and Journalism in Paris. She has published five novels,two short story collections, a collection of e-mail correspondence and many children books. She has received the literary...

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Published Reviews

Mar.26.2008

 

I shall focus on the four novels, the first three of which the author refers to as her “apprenticeship trilogy,” where the subject is novel-writing itself. Indeed, writing about writing seems to be...

Mar.26.2008

When the heroine of the first story in Amanda Michalopoulou’s latest book, “Tha ithela” (“I’d Like”), purloins a red beret from a sheet-covered body on a hospital gurney, we know we are in classic...