where the writers are

Adam Fieled's Writings

Bad News Bats
Apr.17.2014
Here's a funny story I've never told- the night, in late 2004, when Mike Land and I acted as "roadies" for The Bad News Bats, Abby's band with Liz McDermott. As an initial tangent, I find it interesting that Abby's years with the Bats ('04-'06) coincided with her great period of artistic fecundity. However rough-hewn and hard-edged the Bats' nexus was, Abs felt...
Bonnard - Indolence
Apr.17.2014
For Bonnard to paint a painting like “Indolence” (1898/99), and, even more importantly, to call it “Indolence” and thus turn it into an allegory, Bonnard had to dig past the mannerisms and concerns of the Impressionists and post-Impressionists back to Manet, who assayed the transgressive in a novel way in mid-nineteenth century France. What makes Bonnard and “...
William Wordsworth
Apr.15.2014
On the surface, there seems to be little common thread binding William Wordsworth’s preface to Lyrical Ballads and Paul de Man’s Criticism and Crisis. The contextual circumstances that gave rise to each were radically divergent. Wordsworth was consciously, boldly inaugurating a new movement in British poetics, away from abstraction and impersonality and into the...
Bonnard - Woman Stockings
Apr.15.2014
Feminists in the late twentieth century loved to deconstruct the objectifying male gaze. Picasso was always one of their favorite targets; pushing up to mid century XX, de Kooning was also singled out, for obvious reasons. There is no inherent problem with deconstructive analyses of the male gaze; unless the inference is built into these deconstructions that the...
Picasso Self-Portrait 1906
Apr.14.2014
Though the conjunction of English Romanticism as a gestalt with the privileged notion of an “I,” an atomized male ego set against society towards nature and the timeless, is something of a cultural/critical cliche, it is nonetheless a cliche buttressed by many levels of truth. If not too many critics and scholars have proposed some kind of conjunction between...
Jacques Derrida
Apr.12.2014
“We provisionally give the name “difference” to this sameness which is not identical.” Derrida’s concept “differance” has its basis in contradiction. What Derrida is essentially “doing,” though he might balk at the notion that formulating “differance” could be “doing” anything, is moving Saussure’s theories of language into an expanded realm, that might be said...
Tolstoy
Apr.11.2014
Anna Karenina, the protagonist of Count Leo Tolstoy’s eponymously named epic saga, has a hinge, and an unfortunate one, both to the twentieth century in general and to America’s twentieth century. The constituent factor of her selfishness— an inability to visualize anything but a narcissistic world, with her standing at the center of a maelstrom of action and...
Madame Bovary - Ava Gardner
Apr.10.2014
One advantage of novels, and novelistic literary forms, is that they allow any given literary artist to present/represent a totalized perspective of humanity and human nature. Both drama and conventional lyricism are comparatively limited— it is only (for example) in the entirety of Shakespeare’s oeuvre that we discover Shakespeare’s gestalt perspective on...
Yeats Reading
Apr.09.2014
To make an intelligent argument for William Butler Yeats as what might be called an “Edwardian” poet, several foundational questions must first be addressed. First, what the central aesthetic tenets of “Edwardianism” are, and how they dovetail with Yeats’ own aesthetic; as a supplement to those questions, the issue of literary value in Yeats, and what in his...
Bonnard - Indolence
Apr.09.2014
As a tag for a literary aegis, “Edwardianism,” to the best of my knowledge, has never been employed. The Edwardian novelists of the early twentieth century (“Edwardian” often denoting late Victorian) are well-known; names like D.H. Lawrence, Somerset Maugham, Evelyn Waugh, and E.M. Forster subsist comfortably in the vernaculars of English-language literati; but...