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Original Publish Date: 
Jul.01.2008

Rebel, a steady seller since 1983, is the first complete biography

Excerpt text: 

The way to the pike was now blocked, deep streams lay on two sides of the farm, and nearly all the horses were without saddles or bridles. Mosby, not knowing whether anyone would listen, shouted to the men that they were to stand and fight, adding that they were to hold their fire for the moment and concentrate on getting as many horses bridled as possible. They were outnumbered by more than two to one, and trapped by the First Vermont Cavalry, under Capt. Henry C. Flint. “As Capt. Flint dashed forward at the head of his squadron,” wrote Mosby in later years, “their sabers flashing in the rays of the morning sun, I felt like my final hour had come. . . . In every sense, things looked rather blue for us.” Flint, confident of his game, divided the command, sending half around to the Confederates’ rear, while half formed on their front. . . .Troops on the Maryland side of the river began to cheer wildly at the lopsided affair they were about to witness. Flint took his time disposing his men. Mosby’s party, only half of which was ready for a fight, continued feverishly to bridle horses in the barnyard. “When I saw [him] divide his command,” commented Mosby, “I knew that my chances had improved at least fifty percent. When he got to within fifty yards of the gate of the barnyard, I advanced, pistol in hand, on foot to meet him, and at the same time called to the men who had already got mounted to follow me.” The men may have been new, but the effect was magical. “They responded with one of those demoniac yells,” he continued, “which those who once heard never forgot, and dashed forward . . . ‘as reapers descend to the harvest of death.’”

Personal Note From You to Your Readers: 

This is the first full bio of Mosby ever written. It's proven durable because it's about a principled man who was a bundle of contradictions: fighter and peacemaker, thorn in the side of the country he loved. I lived in the zone of his wartime operations and interviewed people who had actually known him.

Publishing Notes: 
<span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial">Foreword by Sen. Eugene McCarthy.<span> </span>New Introductions by Peter A. Brown and Benjamin Franklin Cooling.</span>
Rebel: The Life and Times of John Singleton Mosby

Rebel: The Life and Times of John Singleton Mosby

By Kevin H Siepel
Original Publish Date: 
Nov.01.2006

This is the story of the settlement and growth of western New York state from the War of 1812 to the 1890s using the never-before-published journal of an early settler as its central thread.

Excerpt text: 

One cold day in early December 1824, the Thayers slaughtered their hogs at the house of young Israel, whose wife had been “sent away.” Love had been invited to join them, although he was not expected to participate in the butchering. As darkness fell, having no better place to work, Nelson and Isaac dragged the bloody hog carcasses into the small, low, log house to cut them up in the warmth of a roaring fire. They worked on the hogs at the far end of the room, away from the fire, while Love sat in a fireside chair, his back to the hog operation. He was wearing the Navy pea jacket that he had worn during the war, and which Joseph himself had occasionally worn during night watches on the lake. About 8 PM, the muzzle of a rifle was eased through one of the darkened window openings, and Love was shot through the head. Bennett gives the version he had later heard of what happened after young Israel pulled the trigger. “Love . . . did not stir from his position. One of the boys behind him, thinking he was not hit with the bullet, struck him with the ax he was using, cutting meat. Love fell from the chair dead . . . The three young men with their father, all implicated alike, took the dead body, buried it in a ravine some distance from the house. . . .” “The judgements that I obtained against the Thayers, . . .” said Joseph, “proved to be the bone of contention which caused the murder.”

Personal Note From You to Your Readers: 

I found a copy of Joseph Bennett's journal lying buried in a library drawer. Others of his day may have been more high-profile, but Bennett actually left us a piece of himself. The book is more than a journal recap. It's an extrapolated history of a man, a town, a region, and a time. Enjoy.

Joseph Bennett of Evans and the Growing of New York's Niagara Frontier

Joseph Bennett of Evans and the Growing of New York’s Niagara Frontier

By Kevin H Siepel
Original Publish Date: 
Apr.30.2009

The biography of a 19th-century Mormon pioneer who became a celebrity after she was captured, raised, and tattooed on the face by Southwest Indians, then ransomed back five years later.

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The Blue Tattoo: The Life of Olive Oatman

By Margot S. Mifflin
Original Publish Date: 
Mar.15.2011

The Donner Party
You know how some died.
Here's how some lived.

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Impatient with Desire: The Lost Journal of Tamsen Donner

By Gabrielle Burton
Original Publish Date: 
Jun.01.2005

Gerald and Sue Glasco wanted to farm and rear their children in the country.

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Original Published Source (if Published Work is not a Book): 
Book is compilation of newspaper columns in the 1960s
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Down on the Farm: One American Family's Dream

By Sue Glasco

Filmmaker and Film critic Donald Richie has been observing and writing about Japan from the moment he arrived in Tokyo on New Year's Day, 1947.

Excerpt text: 

“During the last fifty years, Donald Richie has been our greatest guide to the East. An outsider turned insider—a beautiful and subtle writer with an eye for the wild life as well as an ear for the silences of Japan.”
--Michael Ondaatje

“Donald Richie is the Lafcadio Hearn of our time, a subtle, stylish, and deceptively lucid medium between two cultures that confuse one another: the Japanese and the American.”
--Tom Wolfe

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Original Published Source (if Published Work is not a Book): 
The New Yorker, Newsweek, The Japan Times, Asian Film, Prairie Schooner, Tokyo Journal, Winds, Where are the Victors? (Tuttle), Public People, Private People (Kodansha)
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The Japan Journals: 1947-2004 by Donald Richie Edited

By Leza Lowitz
Original Publish Date: 
Oct.01.1994

Hoffman here proves herself a first-rate guide to Eastern Europe, offering vivid snapshots of conditions in the former Soviet satellites.

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Exit into History

Exit into History: A Journey Through the New Eastern Europe

By Eva Hoffman
Original Publish Date: 
Mar.30.2008

A mosaic sketch of the twentieth century's leading chemist, and the only person to win two unshared Nobel Prizes, comprised of excerpts from his writings and original commentary.

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Linus Pauling: Scientist and Peacemaker

By Thomas Hager
Original Publish Date: 
Sep.01.2003
Excerpt text: 

"Whereas it might be erroneous to claim that the literature, art, and music of the Harlem Renaissance revolutionized the practice of democracy in the United States, it would not be an error to point out that the ideas they championed did impact on America’s understanding, and subsequently its application, of democracy. The absurdities, contradictions, and hypocrisies of the racist mentality that ruled America was publicly dissected time and again to clarify the painful difference between what the country proposed to do in the name of freedom and what it in fact did do under the presumptions of white superiority. Harlem Renaissance writers and artists fashioned a powerful mirror of conscience that forced the United States to confront the reality of its moral and political failures in regard to its citizen “Negroes.” By promoting and sharing the experience of black culture the men and women of the Harlem Renaissance set in motion the mechanism that would allow the idea of “Negroes” as Americans to become in the long decades that followed, the reality of blacks as African Americans. "

 

Personal Note From You to Your Readers: 

"I feel blessed to have witnessed the encyclopedia’s impact as it went on to win awards, receive a recommendation as one of ESSENCE Magazine’s recommended holiday gift items, and Black Book Reviews’ “Recommended Titles for the Home Library.” Moreover, it became a highly valued resource for students of the era at every level and helped to launch a publishing frenzy on related subjects, thus documenting the great era more thoroughly than ever before."
--Aberjhani

Publishing Notes: 
In 2003, the “Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance” published by Facts On File became the first comprehensive volume on the much celebrated movement that gave birth to modern black culture. In February 2006, Black Issues Book Review voted the encyclopedia one its “essential titles for the home library.” Prior to that, it won the Choice Academic Title Award and Best History Book Award for it’s treatment of an era that not only gave us such outstanding authors as Zora Neale Hurston and leaders like James Weldon Johnson, but laid the foundation for the Civil Rights Movement and provided such lasting legacies as gospel music, jazz, the blues, rap, and other staples of African-American culture.
Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance by Aberjhani and Sandra L. West

Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance (Facts on File)

By Aberjhani
Original Publish Date: 
Oct.01.2004

In the late 1950s the Soviet Union shocked the world by placing a small satellite—Sputnik—in orbit around the earth.

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Gus Grissom: The Lost Astronaut

By Ray E. Boomhower

In these personal, evocative, original essays, thirty contemporary black and white, young and older writers--from Pulitzer Prize and MacArthur Award winners to brand new voices--share their intima

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WHEN RACE BECOMES REAL: Black and White Writers Confront Their Personal Histories

WHEN RACE BECOMES REAL: Black and White Writers Confront Their Personal Histories

By Bernestine Singley
Original Publish Date: 
Jul.21.1993

The letters of the British Post-Impressionist painter Vanessa Bell, the sister of Virginia Woolf, wife of critic Clive Bell, lover of critic Roger Fry, life partner of Duncan Grant, and mother of the

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Selected Letters of Vanessa Bell

By Regina Marler
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An American in Gandhi's India. The Biography of Satyanand Stokes. Foreword by His Holiness the Dalai Lama

By Asha Sharma
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An American in Gandhi's India. The Biography of Satyanand Stokes. Foreword by His Holiness the Dalai Lama

By Asha Sharma
Original Publish Date: 
Oct.01.1998
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A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Mary Pinchot Meyer

By nina burleigh
Original Publish Date: 
Jul.04.2009

See Ya is a story that crosses generations and histories.

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See Ya

By Cheryl Kerr
Original Publish Date: 
Jan.21.2011

After her father died, Leila Levinson found horrifying photographs his World War II Army trunk that revealed he had been among the l

Excerpt text: 

Down in the basement of my father's medical office, the trunk sat in the far corner, the Nazi helmet still standing watch on top.

I walked over and circled it, the air around it heavy, as if I was underwater, drifting close to an artifact that held some ancient secret. I held my breath, gripped the surprisingly cold helmet, and set it on the floor, then unlatched the trunk’s brackets and raised the lid. On top lay the army jacket my father wore in the portrait hanging in the family den, its dark green wool softer than I had imagined. Alan held it up, and I saw mysterious emblems: a Roman numeral VII within the shape of a seven-point star, an odd pyramid-shaped gold form surrounded by blue. Four gold bars bordered the cuff of one sleeve. No moth holes, no mildew. The trunk had preserved the jacket well.

Inside the trunk sat a Florsheim shoebox big enough to hold boots. When I took off the lid, photographs spilled out. There were hundreds inside. One showed endless ocean, faint ripples the only clue that the empty expanse was water, illuminated by a cloud-shrouded moon. My father’s seismographic handwriting noted on the back: The English Channel, June 2, 1944. Prelude to the Invasion.

Other photos were of GIs lying on the ground—white bandages on their crowns, arms, and thighs. Of soldiers wearing Red Cross armbands, notations like The Clearing Station on “Utah” Beach, Normandy, June 8, ’44. Of huge circus-sized tents, emblazoned with enormous Red Crosses. Lines of GIs holding plates and cups. Mountains of rubble next to the remains of churches and homes. Expanses of snow, of tanks and bodies covered in snow. Fields covered with white crosses and an occasional Star of David. The boys who died in the Ardennes. A lad in our battalion.

I flipped through the photos, repetitive records of war’s destruction until, at the bottom of the box, different types of images seized my eyes. Rows and rows of blurred stripes that cascaded into a wave. A foot emerged from the chaos, a leg. Many legs. Grotesquely frozen faces. My fingers pinched the top corner and turned the photo over. Nordhausen, Germany.

Nordhausen. What was Nordhausen? Another photo, more focused: a long canal-shaped ditch filled with bodies. An endless row of bodies. The burial of the concentration camps victims. April 15, 1945.

When I tell my friends about this moment, they want to know: What did you feel when you discovered that your father had witnessed a Nazi concentration camp? For the longest time I searched for the word. Fear? Anguish? None felt true, yet how could I not have felt anything at what has come to be one of the defining moments of my adult life?

I tell them the basement went white around me. My lungs pressed against my ribs and I felt desperate to breathe. That I dumped the photos back into the box and ran up the stairs, up and out into the hallway, the smell of rubbing alcohol relaxing my lungs.

Only now have I found the word. Shock. I went into shock.

Moments after I ran up the basement staircase, Alan stood next to me, shutting off the basement light.

“Those photographs were intense,” he said.

I nodded, pain in my temples squeezing my head like a clamp. As we drove back to our family’s home in nearby Metuchen, I placed my purse on my lap and felt the weight of the glass paperweight against my thigh. I closed my eyes and leaned my head against the cold window. Morbid stripes undulated under my eyelids. What, what were those photos doing among my father’s photographs? Why had he made notes on the back of them—as if he had been there—as if he had seen a concentration camp? It wasn’t possible. There was no way he could have seen one of the camps and not have told us.

“Unless you want it, I’ll ship the trunk back to my place along with the other things I’m taking,” Alan said.

“Fine, sure,” I replied. “You can have them.”

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cover of Gated Grief

Gated Grief: The Daughter of a GI Concentration Camp Liberator Discovers a Legacy of Trauma

By Leila Levinson
Original Publish Date: 
Mar.15.2004

New Buffalo was one of the most successful of the collective farms that dotted the country in the 1960s and 1970s.

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New Buffalo

New Buffalo: Journals from a Taos Commune

By Arthur Kopecky
Original Publish Date: 
Nov.29.2011

What do Hedy Lamarr, avant-garde composer George Antheil, and your cell phone have in common?

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Hedy's Folly

Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World

By Richard Rhodes
Original Publish Date: 
Jan.11.2012

Julian Bell explores the life of a younger member, and sole poet, of the Bloomsbury Group, the most important community of British writers and intellectuals in the twentieth century, whi

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Julian Bell: From Bloomsbury to the Spanish Civil War

By Peter Stansky