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King Lear | King Lear

dale-estey's picture
Apr.22.2011
For Derek Jacobi, Now Is the Time for a Certain Role By SARAH LYALL Johan Persson Derek Jacobi as the title character in “King Lear.” The play, directed by Michael Grandage, begins performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Thursday. Johan Persson Derek Jacobi performing in “King Lear”...
anthony-maulucci's picture
Aug.05.2010
In the opening scene of Shakespeare’s great tragedy, King Lear, we are presented with two portraits of fathers, one of whom is humorous and indulgent, the other autocratic and unforgiving. The scene sets the action of the play in motion and shows how the light of truth is snuffed out by the...
christopher-moore's picture
Jun.29.2010
By popular demand, I'm doing another dramatic reading of Fool with my commentary in San Francisco on July 24th. I'll be on stage at the Brava Theater in San Francisco with a group of actors from the American Conservatory Theater, there will be readings from Fool, King Lear, I'll tell stories and...
julia-flynn-siler's picture
Jul.08.2008
What can Shakespeare teach us about a troubled family business? That’s a question I’ll try to answer at a discussion hosted by a long-lasting and large book group in Burlingame, Calif., this fall. Over the summer, the group has decided to read Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, alongside my book,...
matthew-biberman's picture
Jul.02.2008
As a way to say goodbye to Lear I thought I would share this poem, and some thoughts sparked by it: Written Before Re-Reading King Lear by John Keats O golden-tongued Romance with serene lute!Fair plumed Syren! Queen of far away!Leave melodizing on this wintry day,Shut up thine olden pages, and...
matthew-biberman's picture
Jul.01.2008
So said Thomas Rhymer in his 1693 treatise A Short View of Tragedy. Rhymer has been dismissed as an idiot, but his book cannot be ignored because it is the first extended criticism of Shakespeare (and of English drama, too). Yet Rhymer’s comments are fascinating, and in their own way, very...
judith-tannenbaum's picture
Jun.30.2008
Matthew Biberman writes today about the "tragedy of tragedy," about nothing and nowhere to fall from. Beckett's "that's how it is on this bitch of an earth," sums up much in today's Lear-related posts. That's the line we repeatedly sighed around San Quentin as the men worked...
matthew-biberman's picture
Jun.30.2008
In previous posts, I have drawn attention to the significance of Edmund—he is the glue of the play. And I have stressed that—for me—Lear is indeed mad from the start. Now I want to write about Gloucester and his fate. Belle and I have already noted that Shakespeare often sling shots minor...
jessica-barksdale-inclan's picture
Jun.30.2008
The only reading I got done yesterday involved The NY Times, The SF Chronicle, and redroom blogs, which were so interesting to me in terms of discussing King Lear and "genius." I'm not sure I have an answer of the genius definition, but it was fun getting toward it. Often, I fine...
belle-yang's picture
Jun.30.2008
Please watch Belle's Youtube video of her Chinese "King Lear," a graphic novel-in-progress.   In reply to Matthew Biberman's post: At the beginning of the play, Lear was merely OLD and irrational because he was afraid. He was merely OLD and not yet mad. I think Harold Bloom said...